Facebook Twitter Text iPhone Android Blackberry

The Garden Mix




Nationally renowned garden expert Melinda Myers helps everyday gardeners find success and ease in the garden through her Melinda’s Garden Moments radio segments. Melinda shares “must have” tips that hold the key to gardening success, learned through her more than 30 years of horticulture experience. Listeners from across the country find her gardener friendly, practical approach to gardening both refreshing and informative! On this page, Melinda shares some more extensive garden tips, which expand on the information provided in her one-minute radio segments.

New tips are added throughout each month, providing timely step-by-step tips on what you need to do next in your garden! Visit Melinda’s website www.melindamyers.com for more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and answers to your questions.
Posts from June 2014


Eco-friendly Control of Bean Beetles
Holes in the leaves of bean plants mean insects have moved in to share the harvest.  Don’t fret there are some easy ways to manage these pests.
Several insects can feed on bean plants and their pods. The bean leaf beetle, Mexican bean beetle and spotted cucumber beetle are the most common.
The bean beetle is ¼ inch long, yellow-green to red with four black dots on its back. High populations can devastate a planting. Cover plantings with floating row covers to keep the insects off. Firmly secure the edges to prevent the beetles from crawling underneath.
The Mexican bean beetle is a bit larger and can be yellow or coppery brown with 16 black dots. The immature stage, larvae, is orange or yellow, fuzzy and rather hump-backed. Remove and destroy any of the insects and their bright yellow eggs that you find.
A thorough clean up in the fall will reduce future problems.
A bit more information: The spotted cucumber beetle can also be found nibbling on your bean plants. It is long and narrow, yellowish green with black spots. Remove insects as found or use one of the more eco-friendly products like Neem, if needed.
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Start New Perennials from Root Cuttings
Expand your perennial plant collection or share a family heirloom with friends and family. Root cuttings of butterfly weed, bleeding heart and oriental poppies to start new plants to share.
 
Take root cuttings of most fleshy rooted perennials in late winter or early spring before growth begins. Wait until after the bleeding heart has stopped flowering and oriental poppies go dormant to make these root cuttings.
 
Start by raking the soil away from the base of the plant so that several roots are exposed.
 
Use a sharp knife to remove several roots. Cover the remaining roots and water the plant.
 
Cut the roots into 2 to 3 inch segments. Lay them on a well-drained potting mix, moist sand or other rooting media. Cover the roots and keep the rooting media moist but not wet.
 
New growth should appear in several weeks.  Young plants can be moved into the garden or container in a sheltered location.
 
A bit more information:  Division is the easiest way to start new plants. Simply use a sharp spade to dig the plant and lift it out of the ground. Use a sharp linoleum knife, drywall saw or two  garden forks to cut the original plant into several small pieces.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com

 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Medinilla for Indoor and Outdoor Gardens
Add a bit of the tropics to your patio or indoor garden with a Medinilla Plant.
 
This Philippine native is a relative newcomer to the North American garden scene. It produces exotic pink flowers several times a year. The colorful buds slowly open and expand into a spike covered with pink flowers and bracts.
 
Grow your plant in bright light indoors or indirect sunlight outside. Water thoroughly whenever the soil just starts to dry. You’ll water less often in the winter.
 
Pour off any excess water that collects in the saucer or use a gravel tray to elevate the pot above the water. This will save you time and improve the growing conditions by adding humidity around your plant. 
 
Only fertilize actively growing Medinilla plants. Use a dilute solution of a flowering plant fertilizer whenever your plant needs a nutrient boost.
 
Keep plants indoors when outside temperatures are below 54 degrees F (12 degrees C).
 
A bit more information: Remove faded flowers as your Medinilla finishes blooming. Fertilize regularly as the plant produces new growth. Once stems are at least 10 inches long you can start the reblooming process. Move your plant to a cooler location with temperatures about 64 degrees F (17 degrees C). Continue to provide bright light throughout the reblooming process.  Move back to its original location once the buds are at least 1 inch long. For more information visit http://www.medinilla.ca/plant-care.html
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Eco-friendly Control of Asparagus Beetles
You wait all winter for your asparagus harvest and so do the common and spotted asparagus beetles.
 
These common pests of asparagus feed on the emerging stems causing browning, scarring and crooking of the stems.  Later in the season the larvae of the common asparagus beetle feed on the foliage.  Severe defoliation can weaken the plants.
 
Both beetles are about ¼ inch long and oval in shape. The common asparagus beetle is bluish black with cream-colored spots while the spotted asparagus beetle is reddish orange with black spots.
 
Start watching for these pests as soon as the asparagus peeks through the ground.  Remove and drop the beetles and their worm-like larvae into a container of soapy water.  Smash any of the eggs as soon as they are discovered.
 
Avoid chemicals as these also kill the parasitic wasp that helps control these pests. A little time controlling these insects means a bigger and better tasting harvest.
 
A bit more information: Control the weeds and you will also increase your harvest. Regular removal and mulching will keep annual weeds under control. Quackgrass and other perennial weeds require more persistence to remove these from the garden.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: EnvironmentHuman Interest


Share This: | More


 
Cilantro
Add some flavor and potassium to your family meals with a bit of homegrown cilantro.
 
Plant transplants or sow seeds directly in the garden after the danger of frost has passed. Cilantro grows best in full sun, cool temperatures and well-drained soil. Gardeners in cooler climates can sow seeds every 3 to 4 weeks throughout the summer for continual harvest. Those with hotter summers will have the best results growing cilantro in the cooler temperatures of spring, fall and even winter in some areas.
 
Harvest the leaves back to the ground when they are at least 4 to 6 inches long. Only harvest a third of the plant to allow it to keep producing. After several harvests or as temperatures warm the plant will set seed. After the white flowers fade, green seeds appear and eventually turn brown. Harvest and use the seeds, they are the herb known as coriander, or allow them to drop to the ground and sprout new plants. 
 
A bit more information: The 2006 All American Selection Award Winner Delfino Cilantro has fine ferny foliage. It branches freely, producing more leaves to harvest and enjoy. Plus, it tends to form flowers and seeds later than other varieties.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Pick a Bit of Purslane for Your Salad
Put down the weeder and break out the harvest basket. The weed you are trying to kill may be a tasty addition to your salads and sandwiches.

Purslane is an aggressive annual weed that can be found anywhere from cultivated gardens to vacant patches of earth. It grows flat on the ground with thick succulent leaves similar to a jade plant. It spreads by stem pieces and seeds that can last for up to 40 years in the soil. You’ll see more of this weed during hot dry summers.
 
Harvest young plants and use the leaves fresh in salads and on sandwiches. Stir-fry, puree or steam the leaves and use it as a spinach substitute. Just don’t overcook as it gets a bit slimy.
 
Be sure to wash the plants before eating and only harvest plants growing in areas where pesticides, including weed killers, have not been used.
 
If you become a fan of purslane, consider purchasing the seed of varieties bred for better flavor.
 
A bit more information:  If you decide to control this weed, pull the plant before it goes to seed. Then mulch the soil with a one to two inch layer of shredded leaves or evergreen needles to help prevent the seeds from sprouting.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Plant Bee-Friendly Plants for National Pollinator Week (June 16-23)
Celebrate National Pollinator week June 16th to 23rd by adding a few new bee-friendly plants to your garden. Both our native bees and the honeybees are important to our gardens and food supply.
 
Borage is an annual herb that grows 24 to 36 inches tall and is topped with beautiful blue flowers. It can be used for seasoning meat, the flowers can be candied and the leaves are steeped to make tea.

Calendula also known as pot marigold thrives in full sun and cooler temperatures. The bees will enjoy the nectar and you can harvest the white, yellow or orange flowers for cooking in soups and stews.
 
Goldenrod is not the cause of hayfever, but is a favorite of bees and other beneficial insects. The bright yellow flowers combine nicely with asters for a beautiful fall display.
 
And put away the pesticides. These products can kill the good insects as effectively as the bad guys.
 
A bit more information: Further help the bees by providing the raw materials they need for nesting. Leave a few small brush piles, dried grasses, reeds and deadwood for the wild bees. Or invest in one of the bee houses or beneficial nesting boxes like those available at Gardener’s Supply.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Gift Ideas for Father’s Day

Looking for the perfect gift for dad? Consider the gift of time.
 
Help him enjoy gardening more or reduce time spent gardening, so he has more time to fish, golf or just relax under a shade tree.
 
Look for tools that make dad’s job easier and fun. Convert an old snow sled into a nifty plant sled. Add a longer secure rope so he can drag heavy items across the lawn.  Or maybe that old wagon can be painted and find a second life as a means of moving watering cans and bags of mulch around the landscape.
 
Buy a stand-alone tool caddy or one that wraps around a five gallon bucket. Fill it with a hand pruner, Dee Weeder, pair of gloves or any of those small gardening tools that seem to disappear when needed.
 
And add a garden journal where he can not only record his garden successes, but also his secrets to share.
 
And don’t forget to offer your time to help him with weeding, mowing or whatever garden chore he least enjoys.
 
A bit more information: Here are a few other projects that will help dad be organized and save time in the garden. Purchase a plastic container with a lid for all of his seeds. Organize seeds alphabetically, label with dividers and take inventory. This way he can store seeds in the fridge to maintain their viability, quickly find seeds he needs and reference the inventory when seed shopping at the garden center or from a catalogue.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Human Interest
Social:


Share This: | More


 
Caring for Bromeliads

Looking for an easy indoor flowering plant? Try adding bromeliads to your collection.

These long blooming beauties require minimal care. Many bromeliads are epiphytes, naturally growing on trees and gathering nutrients and water from the environment, not by parasitizing the plants they live upon. You will find bromeliads at garden centers and florists mounted on boards, rocks or growing in well-drained potting or orchid mix.
 
Water the plants often enough to prevent the roots from drying out. Those bromeliads with a rosette of leaves that form a vase or tank absorb the water more efficiently through their leaves. So be sure to keep water in the leaf “tank” to keep these thriving.
 
Fertilize actively growing plants during the growing season with a dilute solution of flowering houseplant fertilizer. Once the flowers fade, the parent plant begins to decline. Don’t worry - new plants will soon appear.
 
A bit more information:  Divide and repot the young plants that form as the parent plant declines. Once these plants reach maturity they can be forced to flower. Place a piece of an apple and the plant in a sealed plastic bag for three days. Remove and wait for flowers to form.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Contrast Colors and Texture to Add Pizzazz to the Garden

Is your garden looking a bit drab? It’s time to liven things up with a few new plant combinations.  

Pair plants with opposite features to create a focal point and add a bit of pizazz to the landscape.
 
Start with color. Pairing plants with colors on the opposite side of the color wheel is sure to grab your attention. Blue salvia and yellow coreopsis, purple heliotrope and orange blackberry lily are just a few examples.
 
Look for opportunities to add some interesting textures. The fine leaves of ornamental grass are great against the bolder leaves of Canna. Or, mix Russian sage with your coneflowers.
 
And look for interesting and contrasting forms. Plant tall spiky speedwells next to round flowered zinnias or set a squatty round birdbath in front of a stand of tall hollyhocks.  These contrasting combinations emphasize each partner’s unique features.
 
A bit more information: The same design strategy works in the shade.  Combine the yellow daisy flowers of Leopard’s bane with the spiky blue flowers of Camassia. Or try mixing Japanese Forest grass (Hakonechloa) in front of a big blue leafed hosta
.
For more ideas on design strategies, click here.  
 
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Human Interest
Social:


Share This: | More


 
National Gardening Exercise Day
It’s National Gardening Exercise Day, so get out and workout in your garden today!
 
Whether you have a large landscape, small city lot or garden in containers, indoors or out, you will burn calories, lower your blood pressure and improve your mood through gardening.
 
Plus, you will be nurturing beautiful flowers for bouquets and fresh fruits and vegetables for your dinner table.
 
No garden? Then plant one. Consider planting a pot of your favorite grilling herbs to grow right next to the grill. Or plant a pot or patch of black and blue salvia, cuphea, also known as cigar plant, and fuchsias to bring hummingbirds to your garden.  And don’t overlook the benefit of growing tomatoes and peppers in a garden or container. They provide lots of vitamins and antioxidants – a perfect complement to your garden workout.
 
Make sure to follow a sensible routine, just like your workout at the gym.
 
A bit more information: Warm up with slow gentle motions. Then ramp up your garden workout with a few lunges as you weed. And be sure to finish gardening with some gentle stretches and slower movement.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Grow Your Own Chocolate – Chocolate Mint, That Is!
Add some chocolate to your diet and garden without adding all those calories.

Chocolate mint is an easy to grow plant with a strong minty fragrance and flavor topped off with a hint of chocolate. It makes the perfect garnish for desserts and as an ingredient in tea, ice cream, mojitos and anything chocolate.
 
Like most mints this is an aggressive plant. Grow it in a pot on your patio, deck or porch to keep it accessible and contained. Place your pot of mint in full sun or partial shade. It prefers cool moist soils, but as most gardeners have discovered, it tolerates a variety of conditions.
 
Harvest leaves and sprigs of your chocolate mint as needed throughout the season.  Don’t be timid - the more you harvest the more new stems and leaves will be produced. This fresh new growth has the best flavor.
 
Store sprigs of fresh mint in a glass of water or dry and wrap in plastic in the refrigerator.
 
A bit more information: Make larger harvests for drying and freezing just as the flowers begin to appear. You’ll get the greatest concentration of flavor. Larger harvests will not weaken the plant. Watch for fresh new growth and continue to harvest as needed.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Celebrate Rose Month – Eat Your Roses
The from-the-garden-to-the-table movement is not just about fruits and vegetables. Edible flowers like roses can provide beauty in a vase or on your dinner plate.
 
Rose petals are edible fresh in a salad, seeped in tea or cooked into jam and bakery.  The flavor varies with the variety and weather conditions, but you may taste a hint of strawberries or green apples when munching on a rose petal.
 
Harvest petals from recently opened flowers. Remove the individual petals and cut out the often bitter portion at the base. Spritz the petals with water to wash off bugs and dust. Pat dry then use fresh or dry for future use.
 
Make sure no pesticides have been applied to or near the plants and that they have not been exposed to roadside pollutants.
 
Leave some flowers on the plant to enjoy and develop into fruit that is decorative, edible and high in Vitamin C.
 
A bit more information: Harvest rose hips when they are fully colored, and better yet, after a light frost when they are sweetest. Use to make tea, candy, sauce, jams and jellies.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
advertise with us
on our blogs
Vote for your Favorite Flower
There is still time to cast your vote for your favorite flower. The American Garden Award program is your opportunity to vote for your favorite of several beautiful flowers bred for the home garden. Some of the most prestigious flower breeders have chosen their favorites to enter in the competition. Celosia Arrabona Red is a plume type cockscomb and it was selected for its easy care, drought tolerance and long bloom. Cuphea Sriracha Violet is heat tolerant and covered with unique violet blooms from spring through summer. Illumination Flame Digiplexis is a foxglove hybrid with spikes of red-pink flowers with flaming orange throats. Last but not least is Petunia Anguna radiant blue. This new hybrid has blue flowers with a white throat. So visit www.Americangardenaward.com today and cast your vote. A bit more information: The 2013 winner was Verbena 'Lanai® Candy Cane' with red and white striped blooms. Santa Cruz Sunset Begonia was the 2012 winner. This cascading begonia is perfect for hanging baskets, containers or mass plantings. This is the sixth year for this program. Check out information on previous winners and contestants at www.americangardenaward.com. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
AWESOME Inspirational Speech!
If you need a little pick me up...watch this!
read more
Looking For a Harley?
It's never too late to start something new! If you're looking to get your own Harley-Davidson, then you need to see the huge selection and great prices at Wisconsin Harley-Davidson in Oconomowoc! #Ad
read more
Thank You!
Words can't describe the gratitude I feel this morning reading all of the birthday wishes. My life has changed a lot in the past year, but what hasn't changed is the appreciation I have for all my family and friends. I'm happy, healthy, strong and blessed in more ways than I could imagine and so much of that has to do with all of YOU! THANK YOU for being my friend!! 33 years old never felt so good!!
read more
Want To Learn How To Ride a Harley?
If you want to learn how to ride a Harley-Davidson motorcyle, you CAN by signing up for a riding academy at Wisconsin Harley-Davidson in Oconomowoc. I signed up for the women's only riding class that starts next weekend AND you can practice in their showroom on this jumpstart!! #Ad
read more
DELLS: The Start
Here we go! Let the journey to The Dells begin...
read more
DELLS: Go CARTS!
Go Carts!
read more
DELLS: Weekend With The Nephews
They're all in one piece.
read more
DELLS: The Ride Home
The car ride home from our dells weekend #selfie, blasting One Direction. -Kidd O'Shea
read more
Perfect For Fall
was recently introduced to cider and now I'm obsessed with this stuff.
read more
Watch and Win
This could be you...
read more
All About The Pack!
Have you see the Kidd & Elizabeth Packer song "All About The Pack" - it's a parody of Meghan Trainor's "All About That Bass!" ENJOY!
read more
Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers found something she was passionate about (comedy) and did that successfully for 55 years! Let your passion lead you to your purpose, it makes life so much more enjoyable.- Kidd O'Shea
read more
BINGO or Packers?
Calling Bingo right now, how are the Packers doing? -Kidd O'Shea
read more
Joan Rivers: Milwaukee's Impact on her Career
How did Milwaukee impact Joan Rivers career? Find out what she told The Kidd & Elizabeth Show in June of 2010. 0:58
read more
Farm Boy Kidd
On the farm...
read more
Six Flags FUN!
Time to ride The Eagle! #best -Kidd O'Shea
read more
Thank You!
On Friday, Kidd & Elizabeth spoke to the students at Starms Discovery Learning Center in Milwaukee and delivered your donations from our Class Act School Supply Drive. Thank you for your generous donations, it's truly making a difference in our community.
read more
Prune Shrubs with a Purpose
Stop! Don't reach for those pruners without a plan in mind. Prune shrubs to eliminate damaged or broken branches, control size or encourage more flowering, fruiting and improved bark color. Remove damaged and diseased branches as soon as they are discovered. Disinfect tools between cuts with a 70% alcohol or 1 part bleach nine part water solution. Pruning during the dormant season, when the leaves are off the plant, allows you to see the overall structure and make better pruning cuts. Those in colder climates should avoid pruning evergreens in fall. Fall pruning exposes the once shaded foliage to the harsh winter environment. Wait to prune spring flowering shrubs like lilac and forsythia until right after flowering. Spring blooming shrubs set their flowerbuds in early to mid summer. Pruning at other times eliminates the spring floral display. A bit more information: Avoid pruning late in the growing season when you can stimulate late season growth. Make cuts at a slight angle above an outward facing bud or shorter branch. Remove a few of the older stems on suckering shrubs back to ground level. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Long Blooming Digiplexis Flowers
Looking for something new and exciting in your garden? Consider growing a Digiplexis plant in your garden or container plantings. This relatively new introduction is a hybrid between foxglove, Digitalis, and a tropical relative Isoplexis. The plant grows about 3 feet tall by 18 inches wide and blooms from mid spring through the end of summer. The tubular flowers grow on spikes and are sterile, allowing all the plant energy to go into vigorous growth instead of forming seeds. Digiplexis attracts the bees and butterflies and makes a great cut flower. Like its one parent foxglove it contains the same toxins. These may cause a rash and can be harmful, even fatal, if eaten. So keep the plant and the water cut flowers were displayed in away from pets and children. Grow it in full sun to light shade with moist well-drained soil. A bit more information: Though the digiplexis is only hardy in zones 8 to 11 it makes a showy annual in other areas. In fact, it was selected as the 2012 Plant of the Year at the Chelsea Flower Show and received the 2013 Greenhouse Growers Award of Excellence. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Managing Boxelder Bugs
Black and orange bugs congregated on the sunny side of your house in fall are likely boxelder bugs. They are not harmful to plants and people, but certainly are annoying. The immature bugs feed on ground level vegetation throughout the summer. The adults move to female boxelder trees, a type of maple, and occasionally to other maples and ash trees to eat and lay eggs. Their feeding does not harm the trees. The problem usually occurs when the adults seek a warm sunny spot, usually the side of your home, to warm themselves in fall. As temperatures cool they often find their way indoors through cracks and crevices. Repair and fill any crevices to keep these insects out of the house. Manage high populations by vacuuming as they congregate or spray the side of your house with soapy water. Test the siding first to make sure the soapy solution will not change the color of your siding. A bit more information: Removing the tree is not guaranteed to solve the problem. Adults can fly and may find their way to the sunny side of your home. Better to seal the house to keep them out or learn to live with these annoying pests. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Harvest and Enjoy Edamame (Soy)
Get the best flavor and nutritional value from your homegrown edamame, also known as edible soybeans, with proper harvesting and care. Harvest soybeans when the pods are plump, green, rough, and hairy. Check frequently and pick when the seeds are fully enlarged, but before they get hard and begin yellowing. Waiting too long to harvest the seeds reduces the flavor and quality. Since the seed-filled pods usually ripen at the same time, you can pull up the whole plant and harvest the seeds from the pods, while sitting on a chair in the shade. Use them cooked or uncooked as a snack or as a fiber rich ingredient with other vegetables and meat dishes. Many gardeners eat them right out of the pod like peanuts. Boil or steam the pods for 4 to 5 minutes, cool under running water and pop the seeds out of the pods. Use immediately or freeze after cooking. A bit more information: These nutritious legumes help promote overall health, reducing the risk of high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. Plus, the high fiber in soy helps fight colon and some other cancers. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Add Color to the Fall Landscape with Asters
Add some color to your fall garden with Asters. Brighten up your container gardens with a few of these fall beauties. Or create fall containers filled with asters, ornamental grasses and pansies. Set them in a pretty pot on your front steps to welcome guests to your home. Or place on decks and tabletops as a seasonal centerpiece. Move them into the garden as they fade. Or add to the compost pile where they can eventually help improve your garden's soil. Use asters to replace fading annuals or fill in voids in your garden. They grow and flower best in full sun with well-drained soil. Asters are hardy in zones 4 to 8, but can be grown as an annual anywhere they are sold. Leave the plants intact for winter to increase overwintering success. Northern gardeners often cover the plants with evergreen boughs or straw once the ground is frozen. A bit more information: The plant taxonomists have been at it again. The plants we commonly call Aster have been reclassified and names for these new groups include Symphyotrichum, Ionactis, Eurybia, and Doellingeria. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Eco-friendly Crabgrass Control
Reduce crabgrass problems in your lawn and garden with a few basic lawn and garden care practices. Crabgrass is an annual weed grass with a small fibrous root system. The wide grass blades lay flat on the ground. Each fall they release hundreds of seeds before dying. Crabgrass thrives in hot dry weather. Reduce the problem in your lawn by mowing high and often. The taller grass shades the soil, preventing many weed seeds from sprouting. Leave clippings on the lawn and fertilize at least once, preferably in the fall, to help your lawn grass outcompete the weeds. Pull the plants in the garden before they set seed. This will reduce the number of weeds you'll be fighting next year. Mulch the garden with shredded leaves, evergreen needles or other organic material. The mulch will help prevent many of the weed seeds, including the crabgrass, from sprouting. It also helps keep roots cool and moist. A bit more information: If cultural control measures have failed, you may consider the organic pre-emergent crabgrass killer made from corn gluten meal. Apply in spring about the time the forsythias are in bloom. These chemicals prevent seed germination. This means both the weed and good grass seeds will be affected. Wait until late summer or fall to reseed or overseed treated lawns. And as always be sure to read and follow label directions carefully. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Starting Roses from Seed
Expand your garden and have a little fun by growing a few plants from the seeds of your favorite rose. Collect the rose hips, those berry-like fruit on your roses, as soon as they are fully colored. Cut open the rose hip exposing the seeds. Soak the seeds 12 to 24 hours, drain and mix with equal parts of moistened sphagnum moss and vermiculite in a plastic bag. Seal the bag and place in the refrigerator for at least three months. You can begin planting the seeds anytime after the chilling period is complete. Plant seeds in a container filled with a mixture of sphagnum moss and vermiculite. Keep the mixture warm and moist. Move to a sunny window or under artificial lights as soon as the seeds sprout. Then transplant seedlings, if needed, after they form two sets of true leaves. Just remember seedlings may not look like the original plant. A bit more information: You can also start new roses from cuttings. Take a 6 to 8 inch cutting from a healthy stem. Remove any flowers and buds. Dip in a rooting hormone and plant in a well-drained potting mix. You'll have roots in about 3 weeks. Keep in mind you cannot propagate patented roses. These rights belong to the breeders that introduced the plant. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
most recent audio
Recent Blog Posts
Vote for your Favorite Flower
Prune Shrubs with a Purpose
Long Blooming Digiplexis Flowers
Managing Boxelder Bugs
AWESOME Inspirational Speech!
AWESOME Inspirational Speech!
Thank You!
Harvest and Enjoy Edamame (Soy)
Categories
Archives