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The Garden Mix



Make plans now to join Melinda on her famous Garden Walks at Boerner Botanical Gardens in 2014!

Nationally renowned garden expert Melinda Myers helps everyday gardeners find success and ease in the garden through her Melinda’s Garden Moments radio segments. Melinda shares “must have” tips that hold the key to gardening success, learned through her more than 30 years of horticulture experience. Listeners from across the country find her gardener friendly, practical approach to gardening both refreshing and informative! On this page, Melinda shares some more extensive garden tips, which expand on the information provided in her one-minute radio segments.

New tips are added throughout each month, providing timely step-by-step tips on what you need to do next in your garden! Visit Melinda’s website www.melindamyers.com for more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and answers to your questions.
Posts from December 2013


Create a Tool Cleaning Station
Make a resolution to keep your tools clean and ready for use by creating a tool cleaning station in your shed or garage. 

If it is easy and convenient you are more likely to do it. So set aside a small space where you can clean and care for tools.
 
You’ll need soap, access to water and a scrubby to remove dirt and grime from all your tools. Keep a jug of vinegar handy to help dissolve rust and mineral spirits to remove stubborn tree sap from pruners.
 
Include steel wool and wire brushes to help with soil and rust removal. Don’t forget the linseed oil for cleaning tools and lubricating oil for keeping tools working smoothly.
 
Buy needed sharpening tool and files and replacement blades for pruners with removable blades.
 
Make sure you have plenty of rags. And don’t forget safety glasses to protect your eyes from flying dirt and debris.
 
A bit more information: Reduce your workload by washing the dirt off tools after every use. Stop by the faucet and wash away the soil before stashing them in the shed or garage. And remove any plant debris wedged in the tools. This is a great place for disease organisms to linger and infest the garden with the next use. And always store tools inside to reduce rust and extend their life.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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December 23rd to January 1st Birth Tree the Apple
If you were born between December 23rd and January 1st your birth tree is the apple. It is said to represent scientific talents, charm and a carefree philosopher with imagination.

Give the gift of an apple tree or plant one in your own yard to honor a friend or loved one with this birth tree. You’ll need two trees or a nearby crabapple for pollination and fruit formation.
 
Look for disease resistant varieties. Consider dwarf apple trees that will fit the available space when mature and be much easier to harvest when it starts producing fruit.
 
Or consider a crabapple. These apple trees have smaller, less than 2” diameter, fruit. You’ll enjoy four seasons of interest while bringing in the birds for added color and motion in the landscape.
 
Look for disease resistant crabapples and those with persistent fruit for the greatest impact, fewer problems and less mess.
 
A bit more information: Look for these and other apple varieties listed as disease resistant. Liberty is a crisp and juicy dessert apple. Freedom was introduced in 1983, ripens a week before Delicious and is great for pies. Redfree is an early apple that has limited storage life, but is a good choice for home gardeners looking for an earlier producer.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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No Fruit on Holly – December’s Other Birth Flower
Holly is a popular plant in holiday displays, one of the birth flowers for December and a favorite evergreen in the landscape.

Holly as the birth flower symbolizes domestic happiness. In ancient times it was shared with friends and planted around homes to protect the occupants from lightening, poisoning and mischievous spirits.
 
But many gardeners complain their plants do not form the beautiful fruit they so desire. You need at least one male for every five female hollies for fruit to develop. Look for male plants listed as good pollinators for the female hollies you select. Some growers plant a male and female plant in the same container to insure you have both sexes. Only problem, if one plant dies, you must look at the flowers to determine which gender survived and which one needs replacing.
 
Make the needed changes and enjoy your holly, berries and all for seasons to come.
 
A bit more information:  Lack of maturity, late spring frost and poor growing conditions can also result in little or no fruit forming. Make sure to plant your holly in a sheltered location with moist well-drained soil. You may need to wait a few years for your plants to reach flowering and fruiting size. A close look at the flowers will reveal the difference. The male flower has a straight stem and a flower containing pin like structures called stamen. The female flower has a swollen base, almost vase like, in the center.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Forcing December's Birth Flower – The Narcissus (Daffodil)
Celebrate December birthdays and have a bit of fun by forcing a few daffodil bulbs into bloom.
 
The daffodil, botanically known as Narcissus, is one of the birth flowers for December.  It symbolizes sweetness and the desire for your loved one to stay just the way they are.
 
All you need are a few daffodil bulbs, a container, and potting mix. If you don’t have any healthy left over bulbs go on-line. Many bulb companies are still selling spring flowering bulbs and some offer pre-cooled bulbs that are ready to bloom.
 
Place a layer of potting mix in the bottom of the container. Pack in as many bulbs as you can fit in the container for an impressive display. Cover the bulbs with potting mix and water. Then store the bulbs in the refrigerator or other 35 to 45 degree location. After 15 weeks, move the container to a cool bright location and water as needed.
 
A bit more information:  Add a little something extra. Once the bulbs are planted, sprinkle grass seed over the soil surface.  Lightly rake to insure seed-to-soil contact. Then water in.  The grass will remain dormant during the cold treatment and start growing once you bring the potted bulbs out of cold storage.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Light up Outdoor Container Gardens
Light up your winter containers. Add some solar lights and accents to give your planters a bit more sparkle during the drab days of winter.

Use solar powered or battery operated optic lights, globes or lighted twigs as vertical accents, focal points or fillers in your outdoor containers. Just make sure whatever you choose is rated for outdoor use.
 
No containers, don’t worry you can quickly create a few. Just fill a weather-proof pot with potting mix or sand.  Purchase greens from your favorite garden center or trim a few from your landscape. Stick the cut end of the greens in the potting mix or sand to create an attractive display. Add some colorful berries, decorative twigs, ornaments and ribbon.
 
Then add some light to your winter containers with one of the many solar lights. Set your planter by the front entrance to welcome guests or on the balcony for you and your neighbors to enjoy.
 
A bit more information:  Change out the holiday adornments for more natural materials.  Adding ornamental grasses, more berries and decorative twigs collected from your landscape can keep your container looking fresh throughout the winter. And the solar accents will continue to welcome and impress evening visitors. Here are just a few of the many possibilities:
fiber optic solar lights or solar northern lights sphere.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Evergreen ID - Look for an Evergreen Day (Dec. 19)
December 19th is National Look for an Evergreen Day. Don’t worry if you already have your holiday tree; take advantage of this unique holiday to get outside and look at the evergreens in your neighborhood.
 
As you walk through your neighborhood, nearby park or botanical garden try to identify some of the more common evergreens.  Evergreens with needles in bundles are a type of pine.
 
Spruce needles are short, usually stiff and individually attached to the stem. Remove a needle, with permission of course. Roll it between your fingers and feel the ridges.
 
Firs also have singular needles, but they are flat. Remove one of these needles and you will see a circular needle scar on the branch. The base of fir needles look like suction cups where they attach to the branch.
 
Now that you can identify more evergreens than most, if not all your friends and family, pass your ID skills along.
 
A bit more information: Hemlocks are a shade tolerant evergreen you may find in the landscape or natural spaces. They have short needles with 2 white stripes on the underside. For a closer look at identifying these evergreens watch my Melinda’s Garden Moment “Pine, Spruce or Fir, Their True Identity” video.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Prevent Bud and Flower Drop on Christmas Cactus
The Christmas cactus is a favorite gift that often grows into a family heirloom. With proper care you can keep this holiday favorite flowering for 4 to 8 weeks.
 
Keep your flowering Christmas cactus in a cool bright location to extend its bloom time. Avoid drafts of hot and cold air, moisture stress and other changes in the environment. This can result in bud and flower drop.
 
Water the soil thoroughly and often enough to keep the soil slightly moist. This tropical plant may look like a succulent, but prefers a bit more water.
 
Fertilize with a dilute solution of flowering houseplant fertilizer once it has finished blooming. Then move it to a sunny window or under artificial lights with your other houseplants.
 
Rebloom your cactus by providing cooler temperatures, drier conditions and as some experts believe 14 hours of total darkness each night.  Start on October 1st for blooms next Christmas. 
 
A bit more information: The Thanksgiving and Easter Cacti look very similar to the Christmas cactus, though the bloom times vary.  For more information on identification and care of these plants - click here.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Make Your Own Icy Luminaries
Fire and candles have long been used to guide and welcome travelers and guests. Give this tradition a twist by making your own icy luminaries this winter.
 
Use milk cartons, coffee cans, tins and buckets as a mold for your icy luminary.  You will also need a smaller container to create the space for the candle.
 
Fill the container with water. Add food coloring, glitter, berries or other decorations for a festive twist. Sink the smaller container in the water. Use stones to weight it down and keep it in place.
 
Set these in a spare refrigerator or outside in cold climates to freeze. Once frozen, and just prior to use, bring your luminary out of the cold and rinse with warm water to release it from the mold.  Remove the center container at the same time.
 
Place an outdoor light or votive candle inside the luminary and then set it outside to greet your guests. 
 
A bit more information: Sound like too much work? Consider purchasing a make-it-yourself kit like the Ice Globe Luminary Kit. All you do is add water to create your own family fun and holiday centerpiece or outdoor lighting.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Dress Up the Table with Poinsettia - National Poinsettia Day (Dec. 12th)
Move those poinsettias out of their foil wrapper and onto your table for the holidays.

Use miniature poinsettias like Mini Star as a place setter. Some come in their own decorative pot or dress them up with a bit of festive tissue, wrapping paper or fabric and ribbon. Then send your guests home with their own mini poinsettia to enjoy throughout the holidays.
 
Or dress up each place setting with a cut poinsettia bloom. Simply cut the flowers off a potted poinsettia plant to the desired length. Sear the end over a flame and place it in a florist water pick. Tuck the bloom into a napkin, set it in a small bud vase or add a ribbon to dress it up.
 
Don’t have the heart to remove the flowers? Then place several potted poinsettias in the middle of the table. Cover the pots with greens. Then add some colorful pepper berries, cranberries, apples or ornaments.
 
A bit more information:  Use poinsettia flowers to add beauty to other holiday adornments. Individual cut blooms make great package adornments. Or use cut poinsettia flowers to create a centerpiece for the table. Combine with greens or display a single bloom in a decorative vase. Dress up your arrangement by adding some faux snow or filling the vase with cranberries, small ornaments or other colorful adornment.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Holiday Tree for You and the Birds
Create a festive holiday tree outdoors for you and the birds to enjoy.
 
Dress up your evergreen trees or shrubs with strands of cranberries and popcorn. Add some orange slices for added color and food for the birds.
 
And keep small hands busy by making some birdseed ornaments.  Use cookie cutters to cut slices of bread into festive shapes. Punch a hole near the top. Then toast or allow the bread to dry.  Coat with peanut butter and sprinkle with birdseed. Run a colorful ribbon through the hole and hang it in the tree.
 
Or collect and decorate evergreen cones. Cover the scales of the cone with peanut butter or suet. Roll in birdseed.  Use colorful yarn to hang these from the tree.
 
Bird seed ornaments also make great gifts for gardeners and bird watchers. Wrap them in cellophane add a ribbon and you have a perfect gift. No dusting or batteries required.
 
A bit more information: Once the holidays are over, move your fresh cut Christmas tree outdoors. You’ll provide additional shelter for the birds and have another tree to decorate for you and the birds to enjoy. See my Family Fun Feeding the Birds video for more ideas.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Growing Freesias Indoors
Add a bit of color and fragrance to the holidays with Freesias. The spikes of flowers come in a variety of colors from white to purple, yellow to red and even blue.

Check with your local garden center, favorite catalogue or order the corms on-line. Plant them in a well-drained potting mix with little or no perlite to avoid fluoride damage.
 
Set the corms pointed side up about one inch deep and 2 to 3 inches apart. Water thoroughly.
 
Precool the planted corms for 45 days at 55 degrees to encourage more compact growth. Move to a sunny location as soon as growth appears.
 
Grow in a cool, about 65 degrees, bright location. Keep the soil moist and fertilize with a dilute solution of flowering houseplant fertilizer.
 
Stake tall strappy leaves to prevent them from falling and keep your plant looking its best.
 
A bit more information:  Purchase ring stakes or make your own with bamboo stakes or twigs and twine to keep floppy leaves in check. Or set the plant in a tall container whose sides help support the leaves and flower stems.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Create a Pest Management Calendar
Is your mailbox filling with next year’s calendars? Put them to use managing pests in the garden.
 
No, I’m not talking about smashing insects with the rolled up calendar. Instead, use them to develop a pest-monitoring calendar for next year.
 
Take a few minutes to review this year’s garden journal.  Look for notes on any pest problems you encountered. Make a note to watch for these pests in next year’s calendar. This helps with early detection; a key to successful control.
 
Consider adding notes about the weather and control measures you tried that were effective.  Try using preventative eco-friendly measures like barriers and traps to prevent problems. Covering your cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower before the cabbageworm moths are active allows you to prevent damage.
 
Setting out shallow cans of stale beer will help you minimize feeding damage by slugs and snails during wet weather.
 
A bit more information: No garden journal? This is a good opportunity to create one that includes your growing successes, failures as well as pest problems. Use a spiral notebook, three-ring binder or computer calendar or spreadsheet. Just make it easy and fun. That way you are sure to keep recording, referencing and putting your gardening experiences to work.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Growing Sweet Potatoes Indoors
The pantry is full of fall favorites like squash, pumpkins and sweet potatoes. But busy schedules may find a few things growing in the back of the cupboard. Don’t discard those sweet potatoes that sprout in storage. Make it a fun gardening activity for the family.

Plant the sprouting sweet potato in a container of well-drained potting mix. Plant it with the growing point just below the soil surface or lay it on its side and cover with potting mix. Grow your new plant in a sunny window and water as needed. Sweet potatoes make a great indoor plant.
 
To see what goes on below ground, try growing your sweet potato in water.  Stick 3 or 4 toothpicks around the middle of the sweet potato.  Set the toothpicks on the lip of a water-filled glass.  Keep the water covering the bottom half of the sweet potato. Place it in a bright location out of direct sun for rooting.
 
A bit more information: Take a look at other kitchen scraps you can grow into houseplants. Plant the base of the celery used in your dressing or the top of your pineapple. It’s a great way to move the garden indoors and keep little hands busy during the holidays.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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We're FOOTBALL parents now!
I'm a bit bias, but my son Anthony is a GREAT BASEBALL player. I think he's a great athlete in general. Now though, for the first time EVER, he's a HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PLAYER! (GO GREENDALE PANTHERS) Anthony's been asking my wife and I to play football for the last 2+ years and our answer has always been "nah, you're a baseball player buddy, focus on that" LOL! Well, I admit that MOST of the reason for our answer was b/c he REALLY TRULY is a great baseball player and we didn't want him getting HURT playing football…I also explained to him that playing high school football wasn't anything like just getting together in the backyard with friends and throwing the ball around and that it's ALOT of work, practice, sweat etc… Well, he's not backed down AT ALL and we just figured hey, he wants to do it, let him find out all of the hard work involved and see what happens! The result: HE'S RAN WITH IT and is excited to be doing it! He's already gotten hurt in camp, got whiplash, was out for a week and came back WITH MORE FIRE to do it! We didn't DOUBT he'd have the passion and drive to do it…we just worried he thought it was something that it's not. He's showed us he's ready for the challenge! It's been FUN to watch him learn something new…and he'll get better and better as the practices and games begin! My wife and I look forward to being a FOOTBALL Mom & Dad for the first time and just enjoying the ride! In the end, it's ALL about the experiences Anthony will have and the memories he'll start making in high school that TRULY matter! Thanks for reading! Thanks for listening! Just…THANKS! -Mark Summers
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Disease Resistant Major Wheeler Red Honeysuckle Vine
Add a spot of red to the garden and help bring in the hummingbirds. Major Wheeler honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens 'Major Wheeler') is a cultivar of the North American native honeysuckle vine. It has been called the best red by many growers and is resistant to powdery mildew. Gardeners and growers report clean, mildew-free leaves even when plants are overcrowded or growing in droughty conditions. The red flowers appear in late spring and repeat throughout the summer. Remove the first set of blooms as they fade to increase the intensity of summer blooms. Grow this twining vine up a trellis, over an arbor, on a fence or climbing over a rock wall. The stems grow 3 to 8 feet long. And the plant is hardy in zones 4 to 8. You'll have the best results growing this plant in full sun and moist well-drained soil. It is heat and drought tolerant once established and will tolerate a bit of light shade. A bit more information: Try growing this and other vines in a container. It is a great way to add vertical interest to your container garden or a colorful accent on a patio or deck. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Build a Bee House
Convert scrap lumber into homes for native bees to raise their young. Native bees are important pollinators needed for plants to produce fruits, seeds and berries. Planting native flowers such as asters and beebalm and trees like lindens will provide food to help attract bees to your landscape and keep them healthy. Providing housing will also help attract these visitors to your garden. Drill holes into, but not through, any size block of untreated wood. The holes should be about 3 to 5 inches deep and 5/16th an inch in diameter for Mason bees. Insert straws into each hole to make cleaning easier. Paper straws are good for nesting but glass or plastic reduce the risk of mold formation. Mount the bee house on the south side of a fence or building. Keep your bees safe by eliminating the use of pesticides on or near the bee house. Better yet, use bee-safe insect control methods in your garden and landscape. A bit more information: No construction skills? Don't worry - you can use hollow stemmed grasses and reeds as the nesting cavities. Place these in a bucket or bundle them together to create a bee house. Click here for more information on building bee houses. . For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Blossom Drop and Fruit Rot on Vegetables
Don't let blossom drop and fruit rot reduce this season's harvest. A few adjustments in your garden care can help reduce the risk. Many vegetables will drop their blossoms when temperatures and soil moisture fluctuate. Extreme heat and cold nights can cause peppers to drop their blossoms and tomatoes to stop producing. Use floating row covers to keep things warm on cool nights or during heat waves wait for cooler temperatures for the fruit to form. Be sure to water thoroughly to encourage deep drought-tolerant roots. Mulch with shredded leaves, evergreen needles or other organic matter to keeps roots cool and evenly moist. Even soil moisture also insures the uptake of critical nutrients. A lack of calcium can cause blossom end rot on tomatoes and other fruit. Adjust your watering and mulching before reaching for the fertilizer. A bit more information: Products like Blossom Set will help with tomatoes, but not peppers. The fruit will be smaller, but at least you'll have some. This will not work with peppers since they drop their blossoms during extremely hot or cold temperatures. A few diseases can also cause fruit rot. Remove the squash blossoms as they wilt to reduce the risk of damage caused by these diseases. And be sure to mulch the soil to reduce the risk of soil born diseases from infecting blossoms and developing fruit. Melon and Squash Cradles from Gardener's Supply Company help elevate your fruit off the soil further reducing disease problems. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Controlling Ragweed, the Allergy Sufferers Nemesis
If you suffer from a runny nose, stuffed up sinuses and itchy or watery eyes, the culprit may be hiding under your shrubs, next to your flowers or along a nearby roadway. Ragweed is the main cause of allergy and pollen asthma in North America and Central Europe. Common ragweed is an annual with ferny leaves that flowers in August and September. Giant ragweed has larger less dissected leaves and can reach heights of 8 feet. Mowing and removal not only eliminates the pollen, but also the 30,000 to 62,000 seeds that each plant can produce. Removing one plant means thousands less to weed next season. Keep your lawn mown, gardens weeded and replant ragweed infested areas with native and ornamental plants suited to the growing conditions. Proper selection and soil preparation will help your desirable plants crowd out this weed. A bit more information: A single plant can release as much as one billion grains of pollen throughout one season. And that pollen can travel more than 400 miles. Enlist friends, families and neighbors in the cause. The more we control this pesky weed the better for us all. For more information, click here. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Leaf Browning, Scorch, on Hostas and Other Shade Plants
Brown leaf edges are common on hostas and other shade lovers when the temperatures rise or the sun is too intense. Brown leaf edges, known as scorch, occur when the plant loses more water than is available or faster than the plant is able to absorb. Reduce the risk of this problem by growing shade lovers like hostas in shady areas free of hot mid-day and afternoon sun. Add organic matter to the soil to improve the water-holding ability of fast draining sandy soils. Water the plants thoroughly and often enough to keep the soil slightly moist. Mulch the soil with shredded leaves, evergreen needles or other organic matter to keep the soil cool and evenly moist. Yes, I know, this also creates the perfect environment for slugs. If a slug problem develops, capture these slimy pests with beer in a shallow can. A bit more information: If slugs are a problem considering planting more slug-resistant hostas. These tend to have thicker leaves like the 2014 Hosta of the Year "Abiqua Drinking Gourd." For more information, listen to my audio tip on Eco-friendly Slug and Snail Control. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Sneak Some Zucchini on Your Neighbor’s Porch Night
Once again it's time to celebrate Sneak Some Zucchini on Your Neighbor's Porch Night. August 8th, National Zucchini Day, inspired Pennsylvania gardeners Tom and Ruth Roy to encourage gardeners to share their excess zucchini with neighbors. If you've grown zucchini you know it can create an abundance of fruit. Harvesting when the fruit is 6 to 8 inches long gives the best flavor and keeps the plants producing. So after you've enjoyed those first dozen or so zucchini on relish trays, stir-fried or in baked goods you may be looking for ways to "share" the harvest. After friends and family refuse your offering of this tasty veggie you may decide to join the fun and leave a few zucchinis on your neighbor's front porch. Just include a few recipes if you want to keep them as friends. Or better yet, take your surplus vegetables, zucchini and all, to a nearby food pantry. A bit more information: Many seniors and children benefit from the flavorful and nutritious surplus vegetables donated by generous gardeners. Visit Plant-a-Row for the Hungry's web site at or call 1-877-492-2727 to find a food pantry near you. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Love-in-a-Mist Flower Growing Tips
Add a little love and beauty to your garden with Love-in-a-mist. The fine foliage, white, pink, blue or lavender flowers and attractive seedpods provide season-long beauty. This annual grows best in full sun and moist well-drained fertile soil. The flowers float above the dill-like leaves on plants 15 to 24 inches tall and 12 inches wide. Harvest a few of the long-lasting flowers to enjoy in a vase. Remove the foliage as it tends to wilt much more quickly than the blossoms. And harvest a few of the seedpods to use in crafts and dried arrangements. Pick when the purple or bronze stripes are visible on the balloon shaped pods. Hang in a warm shaded location to dry. Love-in-a-mist is self-seeding. So once you have a plant growing and flowering in the garden, just leave a few seedpods on the plants, don't disturb the soil and you'll be rewarded with lots of new plants each year. A bit more information: This plant is known botanically as Nigella damascena. It does not transplant well. So buy new seeds or collect seeds from existing plants when you want to start this plant in a new location in the landscape. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Joe-Pye Weed for you and the Butterflies to Enjoy
Add some bold beauty and butterfly appeal to your garden with Joe-Pye Weed. This summer through fall blooming perennial is hardy in zones 3 to 9. It grows best in full sun to part shade and moist fertile soil. The leaves will scorch - form brown edges - if the soil is allowed to dry. So be sure to mulch with shredded leaves, evergreen needles or other organic matter to keep the soil consistently moist throughout the season. Joe Pye weed grows 5 to 7 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide. The leaves give off a hint of vanilla when crushed. The small purple or white flowers form large clusters known as panicles 12 to 18 inches across. If this sounds too big for your landscape, don't fret. Shorter varieties like Gateway at 4 to 6 feet tall and 3 to 5 feet wide and Little Joe at 3 to 4 feet tall and wide may work for you. A bit more information: The Chicago Botanic Garden recently evaluated the various Joe-Pye weeds and their relatives. They looked at plants as short as 17 inches and as tall as 90. See the results of their comparative study by clicking here. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Cutest Sibling Video EVER!
I can't even handle how cute this video is!!
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