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The Garden Mix




Nationally renowned garden expert Melinda Myers helps everyday gardeners find success and ease in the garden through her Melinda’s Garden Moments radio segments. Melinda shares “must have” tips that hold the key to gardening success, learned through her more than 30 years of horticulture experience. Listeners from across the country find her gardener friendly, practical approach to gardening both refreshing and informative! On this page, Melinda shares some more extensive garden tips, which expand on the information provided in her one-minute radio segments.

New tips are added throughout each month, providing timely step-by-step tips on what you need to do next in your garden! Visit Melinda’s website www.melindamyers.com for more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and answers to your questions.
Posts from October 2013


Walnut, Birth Tree for October 24 – November 11
If you were born between October 24th and November 11 your birth tree is the walnut. It represents intellect, passion and confidence.

We all know our birthstones and perhaps birth flower, but often we don’t know our birth tree. Consider planting a tree in honor of a child’s birth, someone’s birthday or just for fun. And using their birth tree, if suited to the growing conditions, can make it that much more special.
 
Walnuts are the oldest known tree fruit dating back to 10,000 B.C. These highly nutritious nuts are prized for their omega 3-fatty acids.
 
The popular English walnut is native to southeastern Europe, the Himalayas and China and hardy in zones 6 to 9 and 10 in the western United States. Give walnuts plenty of room to grow as they can reach a mature size of 50 feet tall and wide. And be patient as it takes 7 or more years for them to start bearing nuts.
 
A bit more information:  In the past they were used for medicinal purposes, including reduction of inflammation, wound healing and even improving bad breath. Be sure to watch for signs of Thousand Cankers disease. This deadly disease has been found in Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and now, Tennessee. Click here for more details.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Halloween Has Gone Pink
Support the fight on breast cancer and add a twist to your Halloween and fall décor.

The Porcelain Doll Pink pumpkin is an eye catching deeply ribbed pink pumpkin. The unique color was part of the inspiration for the Pink Pumpkin Patch Foundation. Growers, retailers and organizations have teamed up to grow and sell these unique pumpkins in support of breast cancer research. A portion of every pumpkin sold goes to the foundation to support research in the fight against breast cancer.
 
The unique color made it the perfect breast cancer fundraiser and the delicious deeply colored flesh makes it a good purchase for gardeners and cooks.  Use this pumpkin for pies, soups and other dishes.
 
As a gardener you’ll appreciate the plant’s excellent performance.  It showed great powdery and downy mildew tolerance and productivity in trials across the country.
 
Visit the Pink Pumpkin Patch Foundation website for more details.
 
A bit more information: Want to grow your own Porcelain Doll Pink Pumpkin next year? All you need is a bit of sun, a container or fertile patch of soil and of course the Porcelain Doll Pink Pumpkin seeds. Start seeds outdoors once the soil is warm and you will be harvesting these unique pumpkins in about 100 days.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Storing and Cleaning Pots
Fall is about clean up and preparation for the season ahead. Don’t overlook your containers when packing away summer garden supplies.

Fall cleanup can save you time during the frantic planting season. Removing organic matter and salt build up can increase the beauty of the container and reduce the risk of disease in future plantings.
 
Don your rubber gloves and start by soaking pots in a 9-part bleach to one-part water solution for 10 minutes. Move them to a solution of dish soap and water and then rinse with clear water.
 
Use steel wool to remove any lingering salt build up on clay pots and a scouring pad for plastic planters. This white often crusty, material is an accumulation of minerals from water and fertilizer. It can be unsightly and may be harmful to some plants
 
Rinse, dry and store the pots until you are ready to fill with fresh healthy plants
 
A bit more information:  Moss covered pots are considered a beautiful addition by some and something to eliminate by others. Conserve the moss coating by only cleaning the inside of the pot. Use a paint scraper and clean as described above if you want to eliminate the moss.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Skip the Rubber Mulch
Gardeners are always searching for better looking, longer lasting and less expensive mulches.  Rubber mulch has been advertised as an attractive and permanent alternative. Think twice before using rubber mulch in the landscape.

Recycling tires is important, but the lack of performance in the garden and harmful qualities make rubber mulch undesirable in the garden and landscape.
 
Research found woodchips were more effective at suppressing weeds rather than rubber mulch. They also found it was one of the more flammable mulch materials and hard to extinguish once it caught fire.
 
Leachates from rubber also contain metal and organic materials that are known to be harmful to human health and the environment. They can cause skin and eye irritation, major organ damage and more. 
 
So stick with the organic materials that not only suppress weeds, but improve the soil as they decompose.
 
A bit more information: Save money and be kind to the environment by using fallen leaves as mulch in the garden. Shred the leaves with your mower and spread over the soil surface. They are great in annual gardens since they can be dug into the soil at the end of the season. For more on rubber mulch, click here.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Fall Fitness for You and Your Garden
Stay fit as you work in your garden this fall.
 
Fall involves raking, planting and preparing for the season ahead.  Keep your back straight and movements close to your body to avoid strain. 
 
Look for ergonomic tools that allow you to work longer and avoid injury from repetitive motion. And keep your hands in a neutral position. You’ll be amazed at the difference this small change can make.
 
Reduce your workload by mowing, not raking leaves.  Small leaf pieces quickly break down and improve the soil. They can also be used as a mulch around perennials, trees and shrubs or as a soil amendment.
 
Your landscape will benefit by fall care and you’ll burn a few extra calories. Raking leaves burns up to 260 calories per hour and works out all the muscles of your upper body. And turning a compost pile makes a good workout for your oblique muscles.
 
A bit more information: Fall is a great time for planting.  Seeding the lawn or those bare spots left from a stressful summer can use up to 155 calories per hour.  You can burn as many as 260 calories per hour when planting spring flowering bulbs, pansies, mums and other perennials.  And those bigger plants like trees and shrubs need more muscle power and can burn up to 295 per hour when planting.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Evergreen Needles Good for the Garden
Put pine, spruce and other evergreen needles to work in the garden.

Evergreen needles don’t make the soil too acidic. They do, however, add organic matter and nutrients to the soil as they break down.  And a look under your evergreens confirms they’re a great mulch.  The lack of plants and weeds growing under evergreens is due to the lack of light, limited soil moisture and the weed suppressing needle mulch.
 
So spread a layer of evergreen needles around trees, shrubs, flowers and edibles to suppress weeds and conserve moisture.  They are free and look good in the landscape.
 
Evergreen needles can also be added to the compost pile. Limit them to about 10% of the mixture for faster composting. The evergreen needles have a waxy covering, are very dry and take a long time to decompose, making them great as a mulch, but less so for fast composting results.
 
A bit more information: Many gardeners are reluctant to use oak and large maple leaves as mulch or in their gardens. These are great additives, but slow to break down. Shred them with your mower or leaf shredder before using them as a mulch or adding them to the compost pile.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Managing Plants that Outgrew their Space
So, that small tree or shrub outgrew the ideal space where it was planted. Now what?  It’s time to decide whether to prune, move or sacrifice the plant and start over with something more suitable.
 
Pruning a large plant down to size takes an ongoing commitment to regular pruning.  This can reduce the health and beauty of the plant and certainly increases your maintenance.
 
Moving large shrubs and trees is difficult and heavy work.  The larger the plant, the larger the rootball needed for transplant success.
 
Consider hiring a professional to move large trees with sentimental value. Keep in mind large transplants are slow to recover and usually surpassed in growth by younger plantings.
 
Sacrificing a large tree or shrub is a difficult decision due to the money and time invested and attachment we have to our plants. It may, however, be the best solution for you and the plant.
 
A bit more information: If you decide to move it, fall after leaf drop and spring before leaves emerge are great times to transplant. Moving trees and shrubs at other times is possible, but a bit more risky.  Listen to my tip on transplanting shrubs by clicking here.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Pentas for Indoor and Outdoor Beauty
 
Pentas, also known as Egyptian star cluster, are a great addition to both the indoor and outdoor garden.

Many of you may know this beauty for its heat and drought tolerance and butterfly appeal. Others may have grown this as a houseplant long before it gained popularity in the garden.
 
Take 4 inch cuttings from healthy plants. Remove any flowers and buds and the lower most leaves. Stick cuttings in a well-drained potting or similar mix to root. Place in a bright location and keep the rooting mix moist.
 
Once rooted, grow your Pentas in a sunny window or under artificial light. Water thoroughly when the top few inches of soil just starts to dry.  Pinch the tips off leggy stems to encourage compact growth.
 
And only fertilize actively growing plants with a dilute solution of flowering plant fertilizer.
 
With proper care and a bit of cooperation from nature you will be rewarded with flowers this winter.
 
A bit more information: Try growing other common outdoor plants indoors in a sunny window. Coleus, geranium, annual vinca (Catharanthus), and begonia are a few you might want to try.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Convert Lawn to Gardens
Tired of mowing all that grass? Consider converting a portion of the lawn into a flower or vegetable garden.
 
If you have a healthy lawn, your soil is probably in good shape.  Simply edge the area you plan to convert into garden. Use a sharp spade or edger to cut through the grass roots. Then cut the grass you plan to eliminate as short as possible. Cover with several layers of newspaper or a layer of cardboard. Top this with shredded leaves, herbicide-free grass clippings, evergreen needles or woodchips.
 
The newspaper or cardboard layer provides an additional barrier to the weeds.  And, as it breaks down and the grass beneath dies and decomposes, they add organic matter to the soil below.
 
You can plant immediately, but you’ll need more effort to dig through the paper layer and freshly covered turf.  Or wait a few months for everything to decompose for easier planting.
 
A bit more information: You can also remove the existing sod with a sod cutter or flat shovel. Use healthy sections of grass to repair damaged areas in the lawn. Or place it in the compost bin, grass side down. It will eventually decompose into compost for use in amending garden soil.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Time to Evaluate and Plan for Changes in the Garden
Stop and take a few minutes to evaluate the success, challenges and failures of the past growing season. Investing time now can save you additional time, money and frustration in next season’s garden.

Start by taking pictures, video or making notes on areas and combinations you like and may want to repeat. Note areas in need of extra color or seasonal interest.
 
And look for ways to decrease water and pesticide use while maintaining a beautiful garden.  Move struggling plants to a location that better matches their needs. Or make a note on the calendar to thin perennials like beebalm and phlox in the spring.
 
Move moisture lovers together to save time and water spent keeping them looking their best. And mulch or refresh mulch as needed to conserve moisture, reduce weeds and eventually improve the soil.
 
A bit more information: Thinning perennials like beebalm and phlox increases air circulation and decreases the risk of powdery mildew and some other diseases. It also encourages stiffer and sturdier stems. Proper spacing is another way to reduce the risk of disease and increase your plants health and beauty.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Lawn Disease: Fairy Ring
A ring of mushrooms or one of dark green grass is a sign fairy ring disease has moved into the lawn.

The fairy rings can vary from a few inches to a few feet in diameter. This fungus feeds on old roots, thatch and stumps not the grass. It can, however, cause droughty patches in the lawn. The thick fungal mass prevents water from reaching the grass roots.
 
Living with the problem is the easiest solution. Water infested areas slowly, thoroughly and often enough to penetrate the fungal mat and combat drought stress. Rake or mow to destroy the mushrooms as they form to improve the appearance and reduce the temptation to kids and pets.
 
Determined gardeners can remove infested soil and replace with fresh disease-free topsoil. Carefully remove the soil 12 inches below and slightly wider than the ring being careful not to drop any infected soil on the lawn.
 
A bit more information: The name fairy ring is the results of many folktales and lore. Some cultures believe the fairy rings mark the spot where fairies danced while others believed there was a connection to witch dances and the devil.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Celebrate National Apple Month
Celebrate National Apple Month with a trip to the farmers market or nearby orchard to purchase or pick-your-own favorite apples. 

Apples are a healthy choice. One apple provides up to 20% of the daily recommended fiber, 14% vitamin C, they’re high in antioxidants, contain no fat and are less than 100 calories.
 
Pick a few to eat fresh, cook with meat, sauces and stuffing and of course a few more for baking into your favorite apple dessert.
 
Be sure to store unwashed apples in the refrigerator to maintain their crispy texture. Wash just prior to eating and baking.
 
Buy your favorites and try a few of the newer introductions. Honeycrisp is relatively new on the market. Known as an excellent snacking apple, many cooks are finding it is also a great apple for baking.
 
Pink Lady is an all-purpose apple that can be eaten fresh or used for cooking, baking, and making apple butter.
 
A bit more information: Have a bit of fun and save a few apples to make applehead dolls and Halloween monsters. Listen to Scary Apple Heads for Halloween by clicking here for instructions on making your own.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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October Birth Flower – Calendula
An edible beauty serves as the birth flower for those born in October.  The yellow and orange blooms of calendulas were considered sacred by some and magical by other cultures of the past. And many used them for dyes, insect repellents and medicinal remedies.

In the garden, calendulas are easy to grow. They thrive in full sun, moist well-drained soil and cool temperatures. In hot weather they slow or stop blooming. Just continue to water as needed and wait for cooler temperatures and the flowers to return. And watch for seedlings in next year’s garden.
 
Brighten up your flower, herb or vegetable garden with these 12 to 18 inch tall flowers. And pick a few to enjoy in your cut flower bouquets.
 
Use the petals to brighten and spice up a salad or dry and brew as a tea. Or add them to soups and stews cooking in a pot. Thus, how they received their common name, pot marigold.
 
A bit more information: The botanical name Calendula officinalis provides insight to the plant and its uses. Calendula comes from Latin “calends” and the English “calendar”. It was said to bloom at the beginning of each month leading to its botanical name. Officinalis means medicinal and refers to the fact the flowers have been used in healing wounds and treating illnesses.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Think Twice Before Staking Newly Planted Trees
Break out the shovel and get busy planting. Fall is a great time to plant trees. The soil is warm and the air is cool, reducing transplant shock.

And once the tree is properly planted resist the urge to stake the tree in place.  Trees allowed to sway in the wind develop a thicker and stronger trunk. They also have a more developed root system increasing their stability and ability to withstand wind damage.
 
Staked trees tend to grow taller, have thinner trunks and poor root development.  Once the stakes are removed the tree is more subject to breakage and toppling.
 
Only stake bare root trees, those subjected to extremely harsh winds, or trees with an extremely small root system and large canopy. If the tree must be staked, use stakes no more than 2/3 the tree’s height, secure the tree to the stake with flexible materials, and remove within the first year.
 
A bit more information: The scientific term for long term changes in a plant’s appearance due to repeated touching is Thigmomorphogenes. Repeated even gentle touching and wind can cause stouter stems in plants. Some avid gardeners use a fan to circulate air and increase the stems on transplants grown indoors.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
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Making Flavored Vinegars
Liven up your meals and extend your garden enjoyment with flavored vinegars. Gather glass jars and bottles free of nicks and cracks. Use non-corrodible metal or plastic screw on caps or new pre-sterilized corks. Wash and rinse thoroughly then sterilize the bottles by immersing them in boiling water for 10 minutes. You'll fill the bottles while still warm. Place 3 or 4 sprigs of washed fresh herbs in each container. Wash the herbs and blot dry. Then dip in a 1 teaspoon bleach and 6 cup water solution, rinse with cold water and pat dry. Heat the vinegar to about 190 degrees and pour over the herbs in your warm clean jars. Leave about ¼ inch of space between the vinegar and jar opening. Wipe the rims and attach the lids. Store them in a cool dark place. Allow to sit for 3 to 4 weeks, strain and rebottle. A bit more information: Don't stop with herbs. Try creating fruit flavored vinegars. For more details on this and safely preserving your garden harvest, click here. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Drying and Preserving Hot Chili Peppers
Don't let those hot chili peppers go to waste. Use them fresh, preserve or give as gifts. Chili ristras are not only decorative, but a traditional way of drying and storing hot red chili peppers for future meals. Create your own ristra with cotton string, red chili peppers and a series of knots to secure the peppers onto the string and eventually the twine. Or dry your peppers in a dehydrator or on a foil lined cookie sheet in the oven. Wipe the peppers clean and spread in a single layer. Speed up the process by slicing through the peppers or dicing into smaller pieces. The peppers are dry and ready for storage when they are dark red, shrunken, but still flexible. Thoroughly dried peppers can be crushed into flakes. Or try canning, freezing or pickling a few peppers to enjoy throughout the winter. And be sure to wear gloves and wash hands thoroughly when you're done. A bit more information: Always label peppers at harvest. Some hot peppers, like Hungarian half sharp peppers, look just like the banana pepper. Try using separate harvest pails or labeled plastic bags to separate the sweet and hot peppers. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Landscape Plans & Planting Records
Fading plant labels and disappearing tags can make planning and maintaining your garden a bit challenging. Avoid these frustrations by writing it down. Use a piece of paper and sketch out the shape of your garden. Don't worry about the artistic value or scale. Right now you just want to capture the general location and name of the plants in your garden. You can fine tune the design when time allows. Write the name of the plant at its approximate location. Or better yet use numbers for each plant and create a list to accompany the plan. You may want to record additional information about each plant such as where it was purchased, when it was planted and the like. If you still have the plant tags you may want to keep these for future reference. Place them in a page protector or container or attach them to the garden map. A bit more information: Put your cell phone camera to work. Use it to take pictures of your garden, plants and tags throughout the season. It is a convenient way to record the information while in the garden. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Tips for Proper Tree Planting
Fall is a great time to plant trees. Follow these important planting tips to insure the health and longevity of your plants. Make sure the root flare, the place where the roots flare away from the trunk, is at or slightly above the soil surface. Dig the planting hole the same depth as the distance between the root flare and bottom of the root ball. Digging deeper can result in the soil settling and creating a water collecting depression around your tree. Roughen the sides of the planting hole to avoid glazed soil that can prevent roots from growing into the surrounding soil. Water thoroughly whenever the top 4 to 6 inches of soil are crumbly and slightly moist. Spread a 2 to 3 inch layer of wood chips over the surrounding soil. And pull the mulch away from the trunk of the tree to prevent rot and disease. Wait a year to fertilize your newly planted tree. A bit more information: No need to stake most newly planted trees. Staking should only be done for bare root trees, trees with large canopies and small root balls, and those exposed to high winds. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Colorado Blue Spruce
Colorado blue spruce are a favorite tree of many gardeners. Their bluish green needles and pyramidal shape are a nice addition to the landscape. But several diseases can kill branches and distort their beauty. One such disease is Needle cast. It's usually not deadly, but it ruins the beauty and screening value the trees provide. Promptly remove and destroy infected branches to help slow the spread of this disease. Disinfect your tools with a one part bleach and nine parts water or 70% alcohol solution between cuts. Make sure your trees receive sufficient water during dry periods, mulch the soil and give them plenty of room for light and air to reach all parts of the plant. Copper containing fungicides are listed as effective against needle-cast and some formulations are considered organic. Proper timing and thorough coverage are critical for effective control. A bit more information: One of the other common disease problems on blue spruce is cytospora canker. There is no effective chemical control. Removal of diseased branches, mulching and proper watering can minimize the damage. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Moss in the Lawn
Moss gardens are a beautiful trend in the gardening world. But for many gardeners moss in the lawn and garden is a source of frustration. Moss, like other lawn weeds, is an indication of poor growing conditions. This unwanted plant thrives in shade as well as compacted, poorly drained, acidic soil. Correct the cause and you will eliminate the problem for years to come. Improve drainage and reduce compaction by adding several inches of compost or other organic matter to the top 6 to 8 inches of soil. Core aeration of the lawn can also help with compacted soil. Increase the light reaching the grass by having a certified arborist thin the crown of overhead trees. Only use lime if a soil test indicates your soil is too acidic. There are moss killers on the market, but if you don't eliminate the cause you will be fighting this weed for years. A bit more information: If it is too difficult or impossible to eliminate the cause of the problem, consider embracing moss as a part of the landscape. Many gardeners pay money for the very plant you are trying to eliminate. Add a few steppers for a walkway or add a few stones and call it a moss garden. Many gardeners in your situation have quit fighting the moss and embraced it as a groundcover. In fact, you will see moss for sale from several gardening sources. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Poor Garden Harvest
Blame it on the weather. This could be one cause for a poor garden harvest. Late spring frosts can damage the flowers preventing pollination. Cool wet weather reduces bee activity and extremely hot dry weather can also prevent flowering or cause blossom drop and all can reduce our harvest. But we also can be the culprit. Overfertilization promotes lots of leaves and stems and discourages or prevents flowers and fruits. Growing plants in too much shade can also prevent flowering and fruit production. Some plants need a male and female or two different varieties to insure pollination, fertilization and fruit production. Don't let all this dissuade you from growing your own produce. Just do a bit of reading and be sure to check the plant tags and seed packets when planning your garden and purchasing your plants. And if things don't work out – just blame it on the weather. A bit more information: Not sure if you have a male or female plant? Take a closer look at the flowers. Female flowers contain a swollen vase-like structure called a pistil. Male flowers have long, thin filament or pin-like structures called stamens. Some flowers are "perfect" and contain both the male and female parts. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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New Ways to Display Pumpkins
Fall is pumpkin time. Find new ways to display these fall favorites. Scoop out the inside and use it for a planter. Fill with potting mix - you'll have a biodegradable pot for the compost pile when finished - or set a planted container inside. Try an ornamental cabbage, short ornamental grass or trailing pansies like cool wave for a fun fall container. Or carve an opening in the side of your pumpkin after removing the center. Create a fall or Halloween display inside. Use faux moss, figurines and your imagination. Scoop out the insides of small pumpkins and use them for vases to create a fun fall centerpiece for your table. Or use them as soup bowls for butternut squash or your other favorite fall soup. Or leave them intact and set them in your container gardens to fill voids or add some fall interest to your plantings. And add a few to your indoor planters as well. A bit more information: Large pumpkins and squash make great additions to the fall garden. Set them in voids, in containers or on top of hanging baskets that are a bit thin on top. For more ideas, visit http://www.countryliving.com/crafts/projects/pumpkin-decorating-1009#slide-10 For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Plant Some Animal Resistant Bulbs this Fall
Don't let flower hungry wildlife stop you from planting spring flowering bulbs. Plant a few animal resistant bulbs in your garden this fall for added color and beauty next spring. Start off the season with a few minor bulbs. Winter aconite and snowdrops are some of the first bulbs to appear in spring. Mix grape hyacinths with daffodils to double your flower power and pop in some Siberian squills for a bit of blue in the spring garden. Try little Tommies, botanically known as Crocus tomassinanus. Garden catalogues claim and I have found them to be resistant to squirrels. Daffodils are well known for surviving hungry animals and now there are lots of new varieties to choose from. And don't forget to try some alliums you may know as ornamental onions. There are small and large flowered varieties and those that bloom in spring, summer or fall. A bit more information: Consider Camassia with blue flower spikes that resemble hyacinth, but tolerate partial shade. Snowflakes (Leucojum) Autumn crocus (Clochicum), Fritillaria and of course hyacinths are a few other animal-resistant bulbs. Southern gardeners need to select low chill varieties or use precooled bulbs if their winters are too warm for forcing spring flowering bulbs into bloom. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
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Making Flavored Vinegars
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Landscape Plans & Planting Records
Tips for Proper Tree Planting
Colorado Blue Spruce
Elizabeth Kay on National TV!
Elizabeth Kay on National TV!
Moss in the Lawn
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