Facebook Twitter Text iPhone Android Blackberry

The Garden Mix



Make plans now to join Melinda on her famous Garden Walks at Boerner Botanical Gardens in 2014!

Nationally renowned garden expert Melinda Myers helps everyday gardeners find success and ease in the garden through her Melinda’s Garden Moments radio segments. Melinda shares “must have” tips that hold the key to gardening success, learned through her more than 30 years of horticulture experience. Listeners from across the country find her gardener friendly, practical approach to gardening both refreshing and informative! On this page, Melinda shares some more extensive garden tips, which expand on the information provided in her one-minute radio segments.

New tips are added throughout each month, providing timely step-by-step tips on what you need to do next in your garden! Visit Melinda’s website www.melindamyers.com for more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and answers to your questions.
Posts from October 2013


Walnut, Birth Tree for October 24 – November 11
If you were born between October 24th and November 11 your birth tree is the walnut. It represents intellect, passion and confidence.

We all know our birthstones and perhaps birth flower, but often we don’t know our birth tree. Consider planting a tree in honor of a child’s birth, someone’s birthday or just for fun. And using their birth tree, if suited to the growing conditions, can make it that much more special.
 
Walnuts are the oldest known tree fruit dating back to 10,000 B.C. These highly nutritious nuts are prized for their omega 3-fatty acids.
 
The popular English walnut is native to southeastern Europe, the Himalayas and China and hardy in zones 6 to 9 and 10 in the western United States. Give walnuts plenty of room to grow as they can reach a mature size of 50 feet tall and wide. And be patient as it takes 7 or more years for them to start bearing nuts.
 
A bit more information:  In the past they were used for medicinal purposes, including reduction of inflammation, wound healing and even improving bad breath. Be sure to watch for signs of Thousand Cankers disease. This deadly disease has been found in Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and now, Tennessee. Click here for more details.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Halloween Has Gone Pink
Support the fight on breast cancer and add a twist to your Halloween and fall décor.

The Porcelain Doll Pink pumpkin is an eye catching deeply ribbed pink pumpkin. The unique color was part of the inspiration for the Pink Pumpkin Patch Foundation. Growers, retailers and organizations have teamed up to grow and sell these unique pumpkins in support of breast cancer research. A portion of every pumpkin sold goes to the foundation to support research in the fight against breast cancer.
 
The unique color made it the perfect breast cancer fundraiser and the delicious deeply colored flesh makes it a good purchase for gardeners and cooks.  Use this pumpkin for pies, soups and other dishes.
 
As a gardener you’ll appreciate the plant’s excellent performance.  It showed great powdery and downy mildew tolerance and productivity in trials across the country.
 
Visit the Pink Pumpkin Patch Foundation website for more details.
 
A bit more information: Want to grow your own Porcelain Doll Pink Pumpkin next year? All you need is a bit of sun, a container or fertile patch of soil and of course the Porcelain Doll Pink Pumpkin seeds. Start seeds outdoors once the soil is warm and you will be harvesting these unique pumpkins in about 100 days.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Storing and Cleaning Pots
Fall is about clean up and preparation for the season ahead. Don’t overlook your containers when packing away summer garden supplies.

Fall cleanup can save you time during the frantic planting season. Removing organic matter and salt build up can increase the beauty of the container and reduce the risk of disease in future plantings.
 
Don your rubber gloves and start by soaking pots in a 9-part bleach to one-part water solution for 10 minutes. Move them to a solution of dish soap and water and then rinse with clear water.
 
Use steel wool to remove any lingering salt build up on clay pots and a scouring pad for plastic planters. This white often crusty, material is an accumulation of minerals from water and fertilizer. It can be unsightly and may be harmful to some plants
 
Rinse, dry and store the pots until you are ready to fill with fresh healthy plants
 
A bit more information:  Moss covered pots are considered a beautiful addition by some and something to eliminate by others. Conserve the moss coating by only cleaning the inside of the pot. Use a paint scraper and clean as described above if you want to eliminate the moss.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Skip the Rubber Mulch
Gardeners are always searching for better looking, longer lasting and less expensive mulches.  Rubber mulch has been advertised as an attractive and permanent alternative. Think twice before using rubber mulch in the landscape.

Recycling tires is important, but the lack of performance in the garden and harmful qualities make rubber mulch undesirable in the garden and landscape.
 
Research found woodchips were more effective at suppressing weeds rather than rubber mulch. They also found it was one of the more flammable mulch materials and hard to extinguish once it caught fire.
 
Leachates from rubber also contain metal and organic materials that are known to be harmful to human health and the environment. They can cause skin and eye irritation, major organ damage and more. 
 
So stick with the organic materials that not only suppress weeds, but improve the soil as they decompose.
 
A bit more information: Save money and be kind to the environment by using fallen leaves as mulch in the garden. Shred the leaves with your mower and spread over the soil surface. They are great in annual gardens since they can be dug into the soil at the end of the season. For more on rubber mulch, click here.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Fall Fitness for You and Your Garden
Stay fit as you work in your garden this fall.
 
Fall involves raking, planting and preparing for the season ahead.  Keep your back straight and movements close to your body to avoid strain. 
 
Look for ergonomic tools that allow you to work longer and avoid injury from repetitive motion. And keep your hands in a neutral position. You’ll be amazed at the difference this small change can make.
 
Reduce your workload by mowing, not raking leaves.  Small leaf pieces quickly break down and improve the soil. They can also be used as a mulch around perennials, trees and shrubs or as a soil amendment.
 
Your landscape will benefit by fall care and you’ll burn a few extra calories. Raking leaves burns up to 260 calories per hour and works out all the muscles of your upper body. And turning a compost pile makes a good workout for your oblique muscles.
 
A bit more information: Fall is a great time for planting.  Seeding the lawn or those bare spots left from a stressful summer can use up to 155 calories per hour.  You can burn as many as 260 calories per hour when planting spring flowering bulbs, pansies, mums and other perennials.  And those bigger plants like trees and shrubs need more muscle power and can burn up to 295 per hour when planting.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Evergreen Needles Good for the Garden
Put pine, spruce and other evergreen needles to work in the garden.

Evergreen needles don’t make the soil too acidic. They do, however, add organic matter and nutrients to the soil as they break down.  And a look under your evergreens confirms they’re a great mulch.  The lack of plants and weeds growing under evergreens is due to the lack of light, limited soil moisture and the weed suppressing needle mulch.
 
So spread a layer of evergreen needles around trees, shrubs, flowers and edibles to suppress weeds and conserve moisture.  They are free and look good in the landscape.
 
Evergreen needles can also be added to the compost pile. Limit them to about 10% of the mixture for faster composting. The evergreen needles have a waxy covering, are very dry and take a long time to decompose, making them great as a mulch, but less so for fast composting results.
 
A bit more information: Many gardeners are reluctant to use oak and large maple leaves as mulch or in their gardens. These are great additives, but slow to break down. Shred them with your mower or leaf shredder before using them as a mulch or adding them to the compost pile.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: EnvironmentHuman Interest
Social:


Share This: | More


 
Managing Plants that Outgrew their Space
So, that small tree or shrub outgrew the ideal space where it was planted. Now what?  It’s time to decide whether to prune, move or sacrifice the plant and start over with something more suitable.
 
Pruning a large plant down to size takes an ongoing commitment to regular pruning.  This can reduce the health and beauty of the plant and certainly increases your maintenance.
 
Moving large shrubs and trees is difficult and heavy work.  The larger the plant, the larger the rootball needed for transplant success.
 
Consider hiring a professional to move large trees with sentimental value. Keep in mind large transplants are slow to recover and usually surpassed in growth by younger plantings.
 
Sacrificing a large tree or shrub is a difficult decision due to the money and time invested and attachment we have to our plants. It may, however, be the best solution for you and the plant.
 
A bit more information: If you decide to move it, fall after leaf drop and spring before leaves emerge are great times to transplant. Moving trees and shrubs at other times is possible, but a bit more risky.  Listen to my tip on transplanting shrubs by clicking here.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Pentas for Indoor and Outdoor Beauty
 
Pentas, also known as Egyptian star cluster, are a great addition to both the indoor and outdoor garden.

Many of you may know this beauty for its heat and drought tolerance and butterfly appeal. Others may have grown this as a houseplant long before it gained popularity in the garden.
 
Take 4 inch cuttings from healthy plants. Remove any flowers and buds and the lower most leaves. Stick cuttings in a well-drained potting or similar mix to root. Place in a bright location and keep the rooting mix moist.
 
Once rooted, grow your Pentas in a sunny window or under artificial light. Water thoroughly when the top few inches of soil just starts to dry.  Pinch the tips off leggy stems to encourage compact growth.
 
And only fertilize actively growing plants with a dilute solution of flowering plant fertilizer.
 
With proper care and a bit of cooperation from nature you will be rewarded with flowers this winter.
 
A bit more information: Try growing other common outdoor plants indoors in a sunny window. Coleus, geranium, annual vinca (Catharanthus), and begonia are a few you might want to try.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Convert Lawn to Gardens
Tired of mowing all that grass? Consider converting a portion of the lawn into a flower or vegetable garden.
 
If you have a healthy lawn, your soil is probably in good shape.  Simply edge the area you plan to convert into garden. Use a sharp spade or edger to cut through the grass roots. Then cut the grass you plan to eliminate as short as possible. Cover with several layers of newspaper or a layer of cardboard. Top this with shredded leaves, herbicide-free grass clippings, evergreen needles or woodchips.
 
The newspaper or cardboard layer provides an additional barrier to the weeds.  And, as it breaks down and the grass beneath dies and decomposes, they add organic matter to the soil below.
 
You can plant immediately, but you’ll need more effort to dig through the paper layer and freshly covered turf.  Or wait a few months for everything to decompose for easier planting.
 
A bit more information: You can also remove the existing sod with a sod cutter or flat shovel. Use healthy sections of grass to repair damaged areas in the lawn. Or place it in the compost bin, grass side down. It will eventually decompose into compost for use in amending garden soil.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Time to Evaluate and Plan for Changes in the Garden
Stop and take a few minutes to evaluate the success, challenges and failures of the past growing season. Investing time now can save you additional time, money and frustration in next season’s garden.

Start by taking pictures, video or making notes on areas and combinations you like and may want to repeat. Note areas in need of extra color or seasonal interest.
 
And look for ways to decrease water and pesticide use while maintaining a beautiful garden.  Move struggling plants to a location that better matches their needs. Or make a note on the calendar to thin perennials like beebalm and phlox in the spring.
 
Move moisture lovers together to save time and water spent keeping them looking their best. And mulch or refresh mulch as needed to conserve moisture, reduce weeds and eventually improve the soil.
 
A bit more information: Thinning perennials like beebalm and phlox increases air circulation and decreases the risk of powdery mildew and some other diseases. It also encourages stiffer and sturdier stems. Proper spacing is another way to reduce the risk of disease and increase your plants health and beauty.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Environment
Social:


Share This: | More


 
Lawn Disease: Fairy Ring
A ring of mushrooms or one of dark green grass is a sign fairy ring disease has moved into the lawn.

The fairy rings can vary from a few inches to a few feet in diameter. This fungus feeds on old roots, thatch and stumps not the grass. It can, however, cause droughty patches in the lawn. The thick fungal mass prevents water from reaching the grass roots.
 
Living with the problem is the easiest solution. Water infested areas slowly, thoroughly and often enough to penetrate the fungal mat and combat drought stress. Rake or mow to destroy the mushrooms as they form to improve the appearance and reduce the temptation to kids and pets.
 
Determined gardeners can remove infested soil and replace with fresh disease-free topsoil. Carefully remove the soil 12 inches below and slightly wider than the ring being careful not to drop any infected soil on the lawn.
 
A bit more information: The name fairy ring is the results of many folktales and lore. Some cultures believe the fairy rings mark the spot where fairies danced while others believed there was a connection to witch dances and the devil.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: EnvironmentHuman Interest
Social:


Share This: | More


 
Celebrate National Apple Month
Celebrate National Apple Month with a trip to the farmers market or nearby orchard to purchase or pick-your-own favorite apples. 

Apples are a healthy choice. One apple provides up to 20% of the daily recommended fiber, 14% vitamin C, they’re high in antioxidants, contain no fat and are less than 100 calories.
 
Pick a few to eat fresh, cook with meat, sauces and stuffing and of course a few more for baking into your favorite apple dessert.
 
Be sure to store unwashed apples in the refrigerator to maintain their crispy texture. Wash just prior to eating and baking.
 
Buy your favorites and try a few of the newer introductions. Honeycrisp is relatively new on the market. Known as an excellent snacking apple, many cooks are finding it is also a great apple for baking.
 
Pink Lady is an all-purpose apple that can be eaten fresh or used for cooking, baking, and making apple butter.
 
A bit more information: Have a bit of fun and save a few apples to make applehead dolls and Halloween monsters. Listen to Scary Apple Heads for Halloween by clicking here for instructions on making your own.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
October Birth Flower – Calendula
An edible beauty serves as the birth flower for those born in October.  The yellow and orange blooms of calendulas were considered sacred by some and magical by other cultures of the past. And many used them for dyes, insect repellents and medicinal remedies.

In the garden, calendulas are easy to grow. They thrive in full sun, moist well-drained soil and cool temperatures. In hot weather they slow or stop blooming. Just continue to water as needed and wait for cooler temperatures and the flowers to return. And watch for seedlings in next year’s garden.
 
Brighten up your flower, herb or vegetable garden with these 12 to 18 inch tall flowers. And pick a few to enjoy in your cut flower bouquets.
 
Use the petals to brighten and spice up a salad or dry and brew as a tea. Or add them to soups and stews cooking in a pot. Thus, how they received their common name, pot marigold.
 
A bit more information: The botanical name Calendula officinalis provides insight to the plant and its uses. Calendula comes from Latin “calends” and the English “calendar”. It was said to bloom at the beginning of each month leading to its botanical name. Officinalis means medicinal and refers to the fact the flowers have been used in healing wounds and treating illnesses.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Think Twice Before Staking Newly Planted Trees
Break out the shovel and get busy planting. Fall is a great time to plant trees. The soil is warm and the air is cool, reducing transplant shock.

And once the tree is properly planted resist the urge to stake the tree in place.  Trees allowed to sway in the wind develop a thicker and stronger trunk. They also have a more developed root system increasing their stability and ability to withstand wind damage.
 
Staked trees tend to grow taller, have thinner trunks and poor root development.  Once the stakes are removed the tree is more subject to breakage and toppling.
 
Only stake bare root trees, those subjected to extremely harsh winds, or trees with an extremely small root system and large canopy. If the tree must be staked, use stakes no more than 2/3 the tree’s height, secure the tree to the stake with flexible materials, and remove within the first year.
 
A bit more information: The scientific term for long term changes in a plant’s appearance due to repeated touching is Thigmomorphogenes. Repeated even gentle touching and wind can cause stouter stems in plants. Some avid gardeners use a fan to circulate air and increase the stems on transplants grown indoors.
 
For more gardening tips, how-to garden videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
advertise with us
on our blogs
Puppy Love...
read more
What The Bucks Need
Do you agree?
read more
Live Your Best Life
Live YOUR best life!
read more
UW-Madison Visit
Here we go! -Kidd O'Shea
read more
Spring!
Picked up some fresh flowers at The Public Market today.#spring
read more
Dirty Car
Time for a wash.
read more
Loving DC
read more
Brunch in DC
Brunch!
read more
Happy Easter!
Happy Easter!
read more
Wild DC Weekend
My "wild" Saturday night in DC included room service and the rental of the new Liam Neeson movie. Cheers to getting old!
read more
Visit The Studio
Boy Scout visit! -The Kidd & Elizabeth Show
read more
Monday...Blah
Who needs a nap?
read more
Ham! Ham! Ham!
Is this how you start your day? Elizabeth is shocked at what Kidd is doing right now. -The Kidd & Elizabeth Show
read more
Men Can't Talk Sexy
Wait until you hear how Kidd & Elizabeth put a new study to test that says "men can't talk sexy." Do you agree? Men Can't Talk Sexy media.991themix.com A new study shows that it is isn't possible for men to change their voices to sound sexy...Is it true? Wait until you here how Kidd & Elizabeth put it to the test.
read more
Low E Glass Impact on Houseplants
You can conserve energy and still grow healthy houseplants. Light, water and nutrients are the keys to growing healthy plants. Many energy conscious indoor gardeners are concerned when considering replacing their windows with Low-E glass. Fortunately it only reduces the visible light needed by our plants by an additional 5 to 10%. A side benefit to your plants is the Low-E glass moderates temperatures indoors keeping plants, especially those growing near windows, warmer at night and cooler during the day. And no matter what type of glass is in the windows – keep them clean to maximize the amount of light reaching your plants. Adjust your watering and fertilization practices to match the indoor growing conditions. Less light, lower humidity and the type of potting mix and containers used all impact the watering frequency and fertilizer needs. A bit more information: Plants need a variety of light (color/wavelength) for proper growth and flowering. Blue light promotes leaf and stem growth, while red combined with blue promotes flowering and bud development. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Don’t Let Aggressive Bargain Plants Take Over the Garden
So you've found a plant that blooms all season, tolerates a wide range of growing conditions and needs little maintenance. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Lots of fast growing easy care plants are overly aggressive. They crowd out their more timid neighbors and often need concrete barriers or regular weeding to keep them in check. Invasive plants go one step further. These plants leave the bounds of our landscape and invade our natural areas. They crowd out native plants that provide food and shelter for wildlife. These should be eliminated from gardens in regions where they are a threat. And beware of bargain backyard plant sales. These are often filled with aggressive plants that have overrun the seller's garden. Ask the seller about the aggressive nature of the plant before purchasing. Years of weeding is not worth the money saved on bargain plants. A bit more information: A good example is common yarrow (Achillea millefolium). This perennial flower can be found in both weed and perennial books. It tolerates hot dry conditions and readily reseeds and spreads. Select less aggressive species and cultivars that do not reseed. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Check Out Our Easter Dance Moves
Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!
read more
Check Out Our Easter Dance Moves
Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!
read more
So far, SO GREAT!
3 & 1/2 months and counting since my family and I packed up our stuff in NJ and made the trek to Milwaukee! Anytime you leave what you've "known" for years and years, you always worry that: It won't work It's not a great fit It'll take a LONG time to FIT IN Well, I'm here to say that all of those answers couldn't be farther from the truth! From DAY 1, my radio family here at The Mix has welcomed my family and I with OPEN ARMS (My favorite JOURNEY song btw) and it's like we've known each other forever! At the same time, my new family of radio listeners (ALL OF YOU reading this right now) have also made me so incredibly comfortable and happy and as stated above, it's like I've known you well, longer than the 3.5 months I've been here! You've helped my family and I find a place to live, great restaurants (my family and I love to eat), great places to visit to entertain my kids, a travel baseball team for my oldest son Anthony and of course, great karaoke so I can get my sing on! I will continue to ask for your advice on different things along the way and I know WITHOUT A DOUBT, you'll be there to answer whatever questions my family and I have! For that, I'm very grateful! Just wanted to take a few minutes to say THANK YOU for welcoming Me, my wife Sarah, and children Anthony and Benjamin with such warmth and kindness! We look forward to being a part of the community for a long time to come! Thank you for listening to 99.1 The Mix! I'm havin' a BLAST! Hope YOU are too! Sincerely, Mark Summers
read more
Invite Frogs and Toads into the Garden
Celebrate National Frog Month by inviting insect and slug-eating toads and frogs into your garden. Start by providing water. A pond at least 20 inches deep with gently sloping sides will work. Include water plants that provide oxygen, shelter from predators and weather and breeding sites. Include a few rocks or logs in the pond for basking and a few alongside the water for shelter. Build a rock pile in the garden. Select a location that receives sun and shade each day. Position the rock pile in more sun if your summers are cool and more shade if your summers are hot. Line the bottom with stones for added protection from winter cold and leave cavities between some of the bottom rocks for nesting, shelter and hibernation. Use a pipe 1 to 2 inches in diameter and less than 2 feet to create an entryway. A bit more information: Look, but do not touch the frogs and toads you attract to your landscape. Bug repellent, lotions and oils on your skin can harm these creatures. For more information see Oregon State University Extension's publication Attract Reptiles and Amphibians to Your Yard. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Grow Potatoes in the Garden or Container
What is white, red or yellow, can be eaten fresh, fried or even raw and is one of the most important staples of the human diet? If you guessed potato, you are right. Grow your own in the garden, planting bag or containers. You can plant small potatoes or pieces of larger potatoes to start new plants. These contain "eyes" that grow into potato plants. You may have seen this happen on potatoes stored in the pantry. Buy certified seed potatoes at garden centers or from garden catalogues. Cut whole or large seed potatoes into smaller pieces containing at least one good "eye". Plant them in a 2-3 inch deep furrow, 10 to 12 inches apart, leaving 24 to 36 inches between the plants. As the plants begin to grow, mound the nearby soil over the tubers until the rows are 4 to 6 inches high. Keep the planting weeded and wait for the harvest. A bit more information: Save space and have some fun by growing your potatoes in a planting bag. Fill the bottom few inches of the bag with potting mix. Set the potato pieces on the mix. Cover with several inches of soil. As the potatoes grow, continue adding a couple of inches of soil at a time until the bag is full. Harvest by dumping the bag and lifting out your potatoes. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Brown Needles and Leaves on Evergreens
A walk through your garden this spring may reveal browning on both needled and broadleaf evergreen trees and shrubs. Winter winds and sun, exposure to deicing salt and record low temperatures are likely the cause. Evergreens continue to lose moisture through their leaves and needles throughout the winter. The winter sun and wind increase moisture loss. Those gardening in areas with frozen soil are likely to see the most damage. But even those in warmer regions may see winter scorch on newly planted or exposed evergreen plants. We can't turn the needles and leaves green, but we can provide proper care to speed recovery. If the branches are pliable and buds plump you should see new growth this spring. Broadleaf evergreens will replace the brown leaves with fresh new growth. Brown needles will eventually drop and the new growth this spring may mask the damage. Wait for warmer weather to see what if any new growth appears. A bit more information: Once plants have started to show signs of new growth, you have a decision to make. Is the plant healthy and attractive enough to nurture and keep? Or, would you be better off starting with a new plant and one better suited to the growing conditions. A difficult decision, but one that can save you time, money and frustration in the long run. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
A Multi-Season Beauty – The Fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus)
Add seasonal interest and bird appeal to your landscape with the white fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus). This slow growing small-scale tree can grow up to 20 feet tall and wide. The slightly fragrant white flowers cover the plant in spring. The male plants produce slightly larger and showier flowers, but the female plants produce an abundance of blue fruit in late summer. Though the fruit is somewhat hidden by the leaves, the birds seem to have no problem finding and devouring it. But don't worry however as they won't leave behind a mess. The fall color can vary from a good yellow to a yellowish green. And the smooth gray bark become ridged and furrowed with age. Fringetree is hardy in zones 4 to 9, grows well in full sun to part shade and though it prefers moist fertile soil, it is adaptable to a much wider range of conditions. It can be found in nature growing along stream banks and the woodland edge. A bit more information: Use fringetree as a small tree or large shrub, as a specimen plant, near buildings, or in mixed borders as an understory. And be patient in spring as it is late to leaf out. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Daisy – the April Birth Flower
Celebrate April birthdays with a bouquet of daisies. This April birth flower symbolizes childhood innocence or according to the Farmer's Almanac they were given between friends to keep a secret. Many flowers share the common name daisy. It comes from the English name "days eye" referring to the fact many daisy flowers open during the day and close as the sun sets. Bellis perennis, known as English daisy, is most often designated as the April birth flower. It is hardy in zones 4 to 8, grows about 6 inches tall and flowers from spring through mid summer. You will find this plant listed as an attractive perennial or nasty weed. In the south the plants often burn out after flowering during the heat of summer. In cooler climates they are often dug after flowering to maximize enjoyment and minimize spread. The young leaves can be eaten in salads or cooked. A bit more information: Sweet peas are also considered the April birth flower. This is especially true in April. This flower represents modesty and simplicity. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Garden Longer with Less Aches and Pains – It’s National Garden Week
Avoid sore and strained muscles that often arise after a long day in the garden. A few simple changes in your gardening habits can keep you gardening longer and with fewer aches, pains and strains. Use long-handled tools to extend your reach and minimize bending and stooping. And if you need to get a bit closer to the ground, try placing only one knee on the ground or using a stool and keep your back straight. Keep your tools handy by wearing a carpenter's apron with lots of pockets or using a tool caddy. An old wagon, wheeled golf bag or trash can make moving long-handled tools a breeze. Use foam or wrap your tool handles with tape to enlarge the grip and reduce hand fatigue. Or better yet, invest in ergonomically designed tools with larger cushioned grips. They are designed to position your body in a less stressful position, allowing you to work longer. A bit more information: Further extend your energy by taking frequent breaks. Use sunscreen, wear a hat and drink lots of water. For more ideas, check out my 10 Pain-free Gardening tips. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
most recent audio
Recent Blog Posts
Low E Glass Impact on Houseplants
Puppy Love...
Wild DC Weekend
Ham! Ham! Ham!
Men Can't Talk Sexy
Visit The Studio
Monday...Blah
Don’t Let Aggressive Bargain Plants Take Over the Garden
Categories
Archives