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Kidd & Elizabeth



Oak Creek

Like many of you, I was shocked and saddened when I heard about the horrific shooting in Oak Creek at the Sikh Temple. But not just as a member of the southside community, but also because I'm a wife of an Oak Creek Firefighter/Paramedic.

My husband Aaron was off that day, but one of his closest friends, Jim (also an Oak Creek Firefighter), was not off and the Temple is near Station 3 where Jim works.

Aaron received a text at 11:11am to report into the station for backup. When he left the house, I was sick to my stomach. Because at that time all of the rumors were spreading on Twitter, Facebook and the Internet that there could be hostages and even the possibility of multiple shooters.

I sat on my couch talking on my phone to family and friends who were asking about Aaron while I was glued to my TV. It was so surreal to see so many familiar places, streets and even seeing OCFD on CNN. How could this have happened in my community? Who would do this? Will the first responders be safe? What is this world coming to?

These are all questions I was aksing myself as my heart was breaking for the people directly involved in this horrible situation.

The Oak Creek police department who responded to that shooting on Sunday are heroes. Even though they probably don't want to be called that because in their eyes they were only doing their jobs, it takes a unique type of person to put their own life in danger to help save the life of someone else.

I'm proud of the men and women who were the first responders on that scene and I'm proud to be a wife of an Oak Creek firefighter.

To help the victims of the Sikh Temple shooting visit WeAreSikhs.com or call Tri City National Bank in Oak Creek at 414-761-1610.

(Photo: Aaron after the 4th of July parade in Oak Creek)


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08/06/2012 8:17PM
Oak Creek
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