Facebook Twitter Text iPhone Android Blackberry

Elizabeth Kay's Blog

 
Posts from September 2012


Ellen talks Packers
Even Ellen DeGeneres (who's a big Packers fan) is still talking about the horrible call against the Green Bay Packers during Monday Night Football against the Seahawks.

Very funny stuff!
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Our President
No matter what political party you stand for, there is only one president of our country. And on Saturday, I was able to go down to the Summerfest grounds and see President Obama speak in front of a few thousand people. Even though I waited in line for over an hour and a half in the wind, and a few scattered showers, it was well worth it.

It was a moment I'll never forget. When I was in sixth grade, my dad and grandpa took me to see Bill Clinton speak at the Mecca downtown. Since Clinton's speech I knew how badly I wanted to see a President speak again. Their charisma and the energy of the crowd is like no other, especially with an election around the corner.

Whatever happens come November, I know my children will learn about President Obama in school one day. And I can tell them I was there, I saw him right in front of me and I lived it! It was the chance of a lifetime.

(Photo: the view from my seats at the BMO Harris Pavilion on September 22, 2012)
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Politics
Social:
Locations: Mecca
People: Bill ClintonObama


Share This: | More


 
I am bummed
I still can't believe what happened last night during the Packers/Seahawks game.

That final call in the end zone which was ruled a touchdown was shocking.

And let me explain, the Packers did not play well and probably deserved to loose, but these replacement refs have lost control of the football game. Someone is going to get hurt and it's time to bring the regular refs back.
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Sports
Social:


Share This: | More


 
Thank you!
What an amazing morning it was down at the lakefront yesterday for the the 14th Annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure!

And thank you so much for everyone who joined The Mix team. We had a record breaking amount of team members this year, so way to go!

I have to say that each year I am blown away by the energy this event brings every September. From the creative costumes, the young children carrying banners for a loved one and even the dogs whose owner's have dyed their fur pink for the race. I love it! And most importantly, the courage of the survivors. I admire these men and women so much and I am in awe at their positive attitudes!
If you have time, think about joining us next year as we race for the cure and help stop breast cancer! It really is a fun time for all ages!

(Photo: Alley Faith from our sister station 103. 7 Kiss FM and I on the bridge outside of the Art Museum at the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure)
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Human Interest
Social:


Share This: | More


 
VIDEO: A self breast exam

This weekend is Susan G. Komen's Race for the Cure at the lakefront and this morning we were talking about the importance of giving self breast exam.  A woman called into the show to remind us that even men can get breast cancer and they also need to give themselves a breast exam.
So...Kidd O'Shea, who has never given a breast exam asked if I could give him one. I'm not sure if he really learned anything during the process.
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Kidd O'Shea's theme song!
I saw this video in an email yesterday from a friend and I thought, "this must be Kidd O'Shea's theme song?" Take a look and let me know if you agree?
 
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
A Birthday Surprise!
Check out what my Grandma gave me for my birthday! A New Kids On The Block T-Shirt and it still has tags on it.

She bought it for me when I was 12, but found out from my Mom I was over them and she decided not to give it to me. She came across the shirt while cleaning her house the other day and gave it to me now for my 31st birthday!
So sweet :)
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Human Interest
Social:


Share This: | More


 
Simply Amazing!
Have you ever seen a sunset that made you stop dead in your tracks because it was so gorgeous?

These pictures don't due it justice, but after yesterday's rain, this was how the sun looked when I was leaving BayShore.
 
Definitely put a smile on my face and reminded me just how magnificent nature really can be when you stop and take notice.
 (0) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Human Interest


Share This: | More


 
Phillip Phillips LIVE!
"American Idol" winner Phillip Phillips was in Milwaukee yesterday for the Idols Live Tour at the BMO Harris Bradley Center. I was able to sit down with Phillip and chat with him before the show.

I can tell you that is is the sweetest guy I've meet to date from the "American Idol" TV show.
 
 (1) Comments
Tags :  
Topics: Entertainment_Culture
Social:
Locations: Milwaukee
People: Phillip Phillips


Share This: | More


 
Reality TV Drama!
I can't believe what I saw last night! I know "The Bachelor Pad" is considered trashy TV by reality show haters, but it's my guilty pleasure!

If you had a choice what would you choose $250,000 or love? That's basically what the show comes down to in the end. And the finalists, Rachel and Nick were faced with that dilemma last night.

She wanted love, but her boytoy around the mansion Michael dumped her. So maybe she'd win the money. Nope.
Nick chose to "keep" all of the money and Rachel walked away with nothing. DRAMA!!! My jaw dropped. And Nick just laughed in her face. A guy like that might have money, but good luck getting love if you treat a friend that way and laugh in her face and kick her when she's down.

 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
Uh, oh...it's coming!
Fall is on it's way and so is Halloween!!

I was driving on the freeway yesterday and there it was in front of the Wisconsin State Fair grounds - the big, orange pumpkin.

It seems like the holidays get pushed up even earlier every year!
 (0) Comments
Share This: | More


 
I WANT this!
Wouldn't you love a dog washing station in your house?

I was touring this year's MBA Parade of Homes and one of the houses had this in their mud room off of the garage...isn't it cute!

With 2 big dogs, I feel like this would be a must in our next house! I LOVE it!
 (0) Comments


Share This: | More


 
advertise with us
on our blogs
Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers found something she was passionate about (comedy) and did that successfully for 55 years! Let your passion lead you to your purpose, it makes life so much more enjoyable.- Kidd O'Shea
read more
BINGO or Packers?
Calling Bingo right now, how are the Packers doing? -Kidd O'Shea
read more
Joan Rivers: Milwaukee's Impact on her Career
How did Milwaukee impact Joan Rivers career? Find out what she told The Kidd & Elizabeth Show in June of 2010. 0:58
read more
Farm Boy Kidd
On the farm...
read more
Six Flags FUN!
Time to ride The Eagle! #best -Kidd O'Shea
read more
Thank You!
On Friday, Kidd & Elizabeth spoke to the students at Starms Discovery Learning Center in Milwaukee and delivered your donations from our Class Act School Supply Drive. Thank you for your generous donations, it's truly making a difference in our community.
read more
Starting Roses from Seed
Expand your garden and have a little fun by growing a few plants from the seeds of your favorite rose. Collect the rose hips, those berry-like fruit on your roses, as soon as they are fully colored. Cut open the rose hip exposing the seeds. Soak the seeds 12 to 24 hours, drain and mix with equal parts of moistened sphagnum moss and vermiculite in a plastic bag. Seal the bag and place in the refrigerator for at least three months. You can begin planting the seeds anytime after the chilling period is complete. Plant seeds in a container filled with a mixture of sphagnum moss and vermiculite. Keep the mixture warm and moist. Move to a sunny window or under artificial lights as soon as the seeds sprout. Then transplant seedlings, if needed, after they form two sets of true leaves. Just remember seedlings may not look like the original plant. A bit more information: You can also start new roses from cuttings. Take a 6 to 8 inch cutting from a healthy stem. Remove any flowers and buds. Dip in a rooting hormone and plant in a well-drained potting mix. You'll have roots in about 3 weeks. Keep in mind you cannot propagate patented roses. These rights belong to the breeders that introduced the plant. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Fall Webworm
As you drive through your community in late summer or fall you may spot webby nests in the branches of apple, ash, birch, cherry, sycamore, walnut and willow. These are the home of the North American native fall webworm. This pest attacks more than 100 species of deciduous, those that lose their leaves in winter, trees and shrubs. The pest is a green and yellow caterpillar that spins its nest near the ends of the branch. These worm-like insects eat the leaves on the branches near their webby nest. Fortunately this is a cosmetic problem since it occurs late in the season and only a few branches are affected. Keep your plants healthy and they'll be better able to tolerate the feeding. Several natural predators and parasitoids help keep the populations in check. You can knock the nest out of the tree with a stick or a strong blast of water if desired. A bit more information: An organic insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), is effective against young caterpillars. Apply it to the leaves surrounding the webby nest early in the season. As the webworms eat the treated leaves they stop feeding and eventually die. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Dividing Spring and Summer Blooming Perennials
Late summer through early fall is a great time to dig and divide overgrown spring and summer blooming perennials. The soil is warm, air much cooler and the plants will have time to adjust to their new location before winter. Dig and divide plants that have stopped blooming, flopped over, or have a dead center. Use a sharp spade shovel or garden fork to dig up the plant. Cut the clump into 2, 4 or more pieces. Remove the dead center and add it to the compost pile. Some gardeners use two garden forks back to back to pry the clump apart. I prefer a sharp linoleum knife or drywall saw. Though some fleshy rooted plants like daylilies and willow amsonia may require a hatchet or machete. You can replant one piece back in the original location after amending the soil with compost. Use other divisions in other areas or share with friends. A bit more information: The old adage "Divide spring blooming perennials in fall, fall blooming perennials in spring and summer blooming perennials in spring or fall" is a good guideline. But experienced gardeners have all stretched these limits. Sometimes necessity and your schedule determine when you divide perennials. Proper post-transplant care will give your plants the best chance of survival no matter when you divide them. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
National Acorn Squash Day
Bake it, broil it, microwave it or stuff it– acorn squash that is. And if you didn't grow your own, visit the Farmer's Market and buy it. Acorn squash is typically acorn shaped, dark green with longitudinal ridges. They are ripe when the fruit is a solid deep green and the rind is hard. Use a knife or pruners to remove the fruit from the vine. Leave an inch or two of stem attached to the fruit, if possible, for better storage longevity. And be sure to use any blemished or frost damaged fruit as soon as possible. Store this and other winter squash in a cool, preferably 50 to 55 degree, dry location. Place the fruit in a single layer spread out to avoid fruit from touching. The better the air circulation the greater the storage longevity and less likely one rotten squash will affect its neighbors. If space is limited, don't pile more than two high. A bit more information: September 7th is National Acorn Squash Day. This member of the squash family contains vitamins C, B6, A, thiamine and more. You'll get the best nutritional value and flavor by harvesting it at its peak. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Bluestem Goldenrod
Add some bright yellow to your late summer and fall garden with Bluestem Goldenrod (Solidago caesia). This plant is also known as wreath goldenrod and naturally grows in open woodlands and bluffs. It is hardy in zones 4 to 8 and is native to 32 states in the continental U.S. and 3 Canadian provinces. Bluestem goldenrod grows about 18 to 36 inches tall and wide and works well in native gardens, woodland gardens, borders, meadows, cottage gardens and more. The cluster of bright yellow flowers occur along the stem and attract butterflies and other beneficial insects to your garden. Grow the plant in full sun to part shade and well-drained soil. Bluestem goldenrod tolerates clay soil and once established, it is drought tolerant. This fall bloomer is basically pest-free and the deer tend to leave it be. A bit more information: Fireworks goldenrod (Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks') is a popular ornamental cultivar. It is hardy in zones 4 to 8 and grows best in full sun with moist to wet, well-drained soil. The plume-like flowers that top this 2 ½ to 3 feet high plant resemble fireworks. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
Eco-friendly Control of Thrips
Poorly developed flowers, stunted plants and silvery streaks on leaves are indications thrips may be feeding on your plants. These tiny insects have file-like mouthparts they use to puncture the outer surface of leaves, stems and flowers and suck out plant sap. They are very small and difficult to detect. Hold a white piece of paper under the plant and shake. Or remove the petals of damaged flowers, place in a sealed jar with 70% alcohol and shake the jar to dislodge and detect the pests. Control is difficult and often not needed as the damage is discovered after the thrips have finished feeding. Provide the proper growing conditions and care for your plants. Avoid excess nitrogen that promotes lush succulent growth these pests prefer. And remove spent flowers that tend to harbor the insects. Manage weeds in the garden and keep thrip-susceptible plants away from weedy areas where the pest populations tend to be high. A bit more information: Beneficial insects like predatory thrips, green lacewings, minute pirate bugs and some parasitic wasps feed upon plant damaging thrips. Invite these good bugs into the garden by planting a diversity of plants and avoiding persistent pesticides. Visit the University of California IPM online for more details on this pest. For more gardening tips, how-to videos, podcasts and more, visit www.melindamyers.com
read more
most recent audio
Recent Blog Posts
Starting Roses from Seed
Fall Webworm
Dividing Spring and Summer Blooming Perennials
Joan Rivers: Milwaukee's Impact on her Career
Joan Rivers: Milwaukee's Impact on her Career
Farm Boy Kidd
Six Flags FUN!
National Acorn Squash Day
Categories
Archives